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Multiculturalism as “New Enlightenment”: The Myth of Hypergamy and Social Integration in Punch

Multiculturalism as “New Enlightenment”: The Myth of Hypergamy and Social Integration in Punch This article examines the commercially successful multicultural film Punch (Wan-dŭk i, Yi Han, 2011) as an example of new “enlightenment” (kaemong) cinema, one that—like its precedents in the South Korean Golden Age cinema of the 1950s and 1960s—supports the official government policy. While classic enlightenment films made during the Cold War era endorsed state-sanctioned narratives of anticommunism, modernization, and development, Punch toes the line of the South Korean government’s millennial project of multiculturalism (tamunhwa). Despite its intent to create a hopeful, affirmative message of tolerance and inclusion, Punch ironically silences the dissenting voice of a migrant bride character (played by Jasmine Lee, a Philippine-born TV personality-turned-representative in the National Assembly) who remains marginalized and peripheral in the masculine narrative wherein male bonding and mentoring reign supreme. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Multiculturalism as “New Enlightenment”: The Myth of Hypergamy and Social Integration in Punch

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/21581665-4339089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines the commercially successful multicultural film Punch (Wan-dŭk i, Yi Han, 2011) as an example of new “enlightenment” (kaemong) cinema, one that—like its precedents in the South Korean Golden Age cinema of the 1950s and 1960s—supports the official government policy. While classic enlightenment films made during the Cold War era endorsed state-sanctioned narratives of anticommunism, modernization, and development, Punch toes the line of the South Korean government’s millennial project of multiculturalism (tamunhwa). Despite its intent to create a hopeful, affirmative message of tolerance and inclusion, Punch ironically silences the dissenting voice of a migrant bride character (played by Jasmine Lee, a Philippine-born TV personality-turned-representative in the National Assembly) who remains marginalized and peripheral in the masculine narrative wherein male bonding and mentoring reign supreme.

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References