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MODES, SCALES, FUNCTIONAL HARMONY, AND NONFUNCTIONAL HARMONY IN THE COMPOSITIONS OF HERBIE HANCOCK

MODES, SCALES, FUNCTIONAL HARMONY, AND NONFUNCTIONAL HARMONY IN THE COMPOSITIONS OF HERBIE HANCOCK able to merge functional harmonic procedures with modal harmonic procedures? Hancock attained national prominence as a member of the Miles Davis Quintet, playing piano with Davis between 1963 and 1968. With his tenure with Davis, his recordings as a sideman on numerous albums, and his own series of albums for the Blue Note label under his own name, Hancock was considered one of the most innovative, versatile, and accomplished jazz pianists of the decade. Bill Dobbins writes that “Herbie Hancock is certainly one of the most influential jazz pianists of the second half of the twentieth century” (Hancock 1992, 6). Hancock studied piano and composition at Grinnell College until 1960, and he became a prolific and significant jazz composer, writing virtually all of the compositions on his seven Blue Note albums between 1963 and 1969.1 In order to set Hancock’s compositional practice in historical perspective, it is important to distinguish between functional harmonic progression on the one hand, and the harmonic procedures of modal jazz on the other. After providing this brief background discussion of functional harmony and modal harmony, I turn to Hancock’s compositions. Functional Harmonic Progression Through the late 1950s, functional harmonic relationships have provided the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

MODES, SCALES, FUNCTIONAL HARMONY, AND NONFUNCTIONAL HARMONY IN THE COMPOSITIONS OF HERBIE HANCOCK

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 49 (2) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

able to merge functional harmonic procedures with modal harmonic procedures? Hancock attained national prominence as a member of the Miles Davis Quintet, playing piano with Davis between 1963 and 1968. With his tenure with Davis, his recordings as a sideman on numerous albums, and his own series of albums for the Blue Note label under his own name, Hancock was considered one of the most innovative, versatile, and accomplished jazz pianists of the decade. Bill Dobbins writes that “Herbie Hancock is certainly one of the most influential jazz pianists of the second half of the twentieth century” (Hancock 1992, 6). Hancock studied piano and composition at Grinnell College until 1960, and he became a prolific and significant jazz composer, writing virtually all of the compositions on his seven Blue Note albums between 1963 and 1969.1 In order to set Hancock’s compositional practice in historical perspective, it is important to distinguish between functional harmonic progression on the one hand, and the harmonic procedures of modal jazz on the other. After providing this brief background discussion of functional harmony and modal harmony, I turn to Hancock’s compositions. Functional Harmonic Progression Through the late 1950s, functional harmonic relationships have provided the

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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