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Modernism and Non-translation

Modernism and Non-translation Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/28/1/150/1576290/150perloff.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 July 2022 Jason Harding and John Nash, eds., Modernism and Non-tr anslation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 232 pp. “An arresting, recurrent feature of modernist literature, especially that writ- ten in English,” declare the editors in their introduction, is “its incorporation of untranslated words and phrases.” True enough, and it is astonishing that more has not been written on the phenomenon of foreign- language citation in the work of T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and many others. The Waste Land, for example, as Harding points out in his own contribution to this essay collection, is a veritable tissue of allusions, inserted in the original Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Provençal and even Sanskrit forms. It is as if the Cumaean sybil’s prophecy, in the poem’s epigraph, could not be rendered in English. How and why writers felt compelled to insert foreign phrases— Henry James, Daniel Karlin notes, included numerous French locutions like à contre coeur (“reluctantly”) even in his own personal notebooks — makes for a fascinating study, but unfortunately Harding and Nash refer to the process as non- translation, a term implying that the word or phrase http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Modernism and Non-translation

Common Knowledge , Volume 28 (1) – Jan 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754x-9713661
Publisher site
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Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/28/1/150/1576290/150perloff.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 July 2022 Jason Harding and John Nash, eds., Modernism and Non-tr anslation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 232 pp. “An arresting, recurrent feature of modernist literature, especially that writ- ten in English,” declare the editors in their introduction, is “its incorporation of untranslated words and phrases.” True enough, and it is astonishing that more has not been written on the phenomenon of foreign- language citation in the work of T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and many others. The Waste Land, for example, as Harding points out in his own contribution to this essay collection, is a veritable tissue of allusions, inserted in the original Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Provençal and even Sanskrit forms. It is as if the Cumaean sybil’s prophecy, in the poem’s epigraph, could not be rendered in English. How and why writers felt compelled to insert foreign phrases— Henry James, Daniel Karlin notes, included numerous French locutions like à contre coeur (“reluctantly”) even in his own personal notebooks — makes for a fascinating study, but unfortunately Harding and Nash refer to the process as non- translation, a term implying that the word or phrase

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2022

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