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Metrical Displacement and Metrically Dissonant Hemiolas

Metrical Displacement and Metrically Dissonant Hemiolas Hemiolas are by definition metrically dissonant, in durational disagreement with the notated meter. But when extended metrical shifts (known also as afterbeats or afterbeat displacement ) displace a composition in part or in whole to the right (in order to emphasize the closing beat of each segment, phrase, and period), cadential hemiolas emerge as consonant agents, in the large rhetorical scheme of things. These hemiolas, which intensify the end-accented beats, assert the notated meter, not the metrical displacement. In so doing, they either reinforce the basic metrical premise of the piece or reset the durational clocks of the piece for proper cadential closure. Examples range from Handel’s keyboard suites and Concerti Grossi, op. 6, as well as Bach’s English Suites, to Couperin’s B-minor Passacaille and Brahms’s Capriccio, op. 76/2. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Metrical Displacement and Metrically Dissonant Hemiolas

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 57 (1) – Mar 20, 2013

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2017115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hemiolas are by definition metrically dissonant, in durational disagreement with the notated meter. But when extended metrical shifts (known also as afterbeats or afterbeat displacement ) displace a composition in part or in whole to the right (in order to emphasize the closing beat of each segment, phrase, and period), cadential hemiolas emerge as consonant agents, in the large rhetorical scheme of things. These hemiolas, which intensify the end-accented beats, assert the notated meter, not the metrical displacement. In so doing, they either reinforce the basic metrical premise of the piece or reset the durational clocks of the piece for proper cadential closure. Examples range from Handel’s keyboard suites and Concerti Grossi, op. 6, as well as Bach’s English Suites, to Couperin’s B-minor Passacaille and Brahms’s Capriccio, op. 76/2.

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Mar 20, 2013

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