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Meter as Rhythm

Meter as Rhythm intellect’s grasp” (302–3), any attempt to dilute the input of “intellect” into the practice of music theory, and writing about music, remains problematic. We can find the twists and turns of Hasty’s exhaustive accounts of aspects of the first movements of Beethoven’s first symphony and Webern’s op. 22 quartet absorbing and even attractive. But Pople’s question reasserts itself: how much do these narratives tell us “about the piece”? To think of meter as rhythm, and of rhythm as process, while acknowledging the resistance of rhythmic experience to intellectual explication, is a substantial challenge to theoretical and analytical convention, and to say that Hasty’s lesson amounts to nothing more than the argument that recollection of “process” should constrain and inform our interpretations of the compositional “product” to a greater extent that has usually been the case in the twentieth century is to underestimate the radical nature of the enterprise he undertakes in this study. That radicalism is nowhere more evident than in his decision to include such extensive graphic representations of his own experience of process as projection, and this is far from a contradiction in terms aimed to point up the unbridgeable contrast between the “static charms” of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-2-359
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

intellect’s grasp” (302–3), any attempt to dilute the input of “intellect” into the practice of music theory, and writing about music, remains problematic. We can find the twists and turns of Hasty’s exhaustive accounts of aspects of the first movements of Beethoven’s first symphony and Webern’s op. 22 quartet absorbing and even attractive. But Pople’s question reasserts itself: how much do these narratives tell us “about the piece”? To think of meter as rhythm, and of rhythm as process, while acknowledging the resistance of rhythmic experience to intellectual explication, is a substantial challenge to theoretical and analytical convention, and to say that Hasty’s lesson amounts to nothing more than the argument that recollection of “process” should constrain and inform our interpretations of the compositional “product” to a greater extent that has usually been the case in the twentieth century is to underestimate the radical nature of the enterprise he undertakes in this study. That radicalism is nowhere more evident than in his decision to include such extensive graphic representations of his own experience of process as projection, and this is far from a contradiction in terms aimed to point up the unbridgeable contrast between the “static charms” of

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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