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Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930

Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930 p m o m 7 2 0 1999 by I h k e University Press positions 7:2 Fall 1999 3 78 Real peace cannot come from reliance on military force. . . . If we want to protect real world peace, humanity must mutually understand, mutually tolerate and sympathize, mutually assist and not battle. . . . To achieve this goal everyone must concretely study both art and science to understand each other’s problems. . . . T h e people of my country, in common with yours, desire peace among nations. . . . You condescend to view our imperfect portrayals of China’s ancient drama . . . and you have chosen me for this distinction [the bestowal of an honorary doctorate], which is intended as an expression of your friendship for my people.’ Attaching such earnest purpose to a Peking opera tour stamps it as a utopian mission, and, since Mei’s above graduation speech was extolled as “a model of public utterance” throughout the press, his listeners must have seen his point.2 China-U.S. relations at the time were far from harmonious. T h e predominant images of Chinese people in American newspapers were of starving, ignorant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-2-377
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

p m o m 7 2 0 1999 by I h k e University Press positions 7:2 Fall 1999 3 78 Real peace cannot come from reliance on military force. . . . If we want to protect real world peace, humanity must mutually understand, mutually tolerate and sympathize, mutually assist and not battle. . . . To achieve this goal everyone must concretely study both art and science to understand each other’s problems. . . . T h e people of my country, in common with yours, desire peace among nations. . . . You condescend to view our imperfect portrayals of China’s ancient drama . . . and you have chosen me for this distinction [the bestowal of an honorary doctorate], which is intended as an expression of your friendship for my people.’ Attaching such earnest purpose to a Peking opera tour stamps it as a utopian mission, and, since Mei’s above graduation speech was extolled as “a model of public utterance” throughout the press, his listeners must have seen his point.2 China-U.S. relations at the time were far from harmonious. T h e predominant images of Chinese people in American newspapers were of starving, ignorant

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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