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Marxism, Anti-Americanism, and Democracy in South Korea: An Examination of Nationalist Intellectual Discourse

Marxism, Anti-Americanism, and Democracy in South Korea: An Examination of Nationalist... positions 3:2 0 1995 by Duke University Press Shin support for highly repressive and authoritarian regimes in postwar Korea. Since 1982 all four main U.S. Information Centers in Korea have been torched, invaded, or both, and anti-American banners and slogans filled the streets during the 1980s democratization movements. T h e rise of Korean anti-Americanism is not a phenomenon confined to student activists or the intellectual left but has spread widely throughout Korea. A 1990 national survey of “civil consciousness” conducted by the Institute of Population and Development of Seoul National University showed that more than one-third of respondents supported anti-American movements; over two-thirds considered anti-American sentiment to be quite serious; and more than half felt American military forces should withdraw from Korea. Although popular anti-Americanism is not new or unique to Korea and is not exactly an echo of the radical rhetoric quoted above, no one can deny that Korea witnessed a strong, anti-American, nationalist surge in the 1980s. While the growth of Korean anti-Americanism has been taken up in scholarly and policy-related works, most of these have attributed it to structural causes, such as the alleged US. involvement in the 1980 Kwangju uprisings, continued U.S. support http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Marxism, Anti-Americanism, and Democracy in South Korea: An Examination of Nationalist Intellectual Discourse

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-2-510
Publisher site
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Abstract

positions 3:2 0 1995 by Duke University Press Shin support for highly repressive and authoritarian regimes in postwar Korea. Since 1982 all four main U.S. Information Centers in Korea have been torched, invaded, or both, and anti-American banners and slogans filled the streets during the 1980s democratization movements. T h e rise of Korean anti-Americanism is not a phenomenon confined to student activists or the intellectual left but has spread widely throughout Korea. A 1990 national survey of “civil consciousness” conducted by the Institute of Population and Development of Seoul National University showed that more than one-third of respondents supported anti-American movements; over two-thirds considered anti-American sentiment to be quite serious; and more than half felt American military forces should withdraw from Korea. Although popular anti-Americanism is not new or unique to Korea and is not exactly an echo of the radical rhetoric quoted above, no one can deny that Korea witnessed a strong, anti-American, nationalist surge in the 1980s. While the growth of Korean anti-Americanism has been taken up in scholarly and policy-related works, most of these have attributed it to structural causes, such as the alleged US. involvement in the 1980 Kwangju uprisings, continued U.S. support

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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