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Lionel Hampton Beats Out New Rhythm for Civil Rights Fight

Lionel Hampton Beats Out New Rhythm for Civil Rights Fight Lionel Hampton Beats Out New Rhythm for Civil Rights Fight Mary McLeod Bethun e I am told that Lionel Hampton, the little orchestra leader who keeps our feet tapping with his drums and xylophones, has developed a new theme in jazz-a theme based on the beat of the tom-toms of Africa. And my mind picks up the same stirring beat as it came down to me, this summer, from the Haitian hills-brought forth by the black mountaineers of Haiti, beating with their bare hands on their native drums. One does not forget the roll of these drums-the character of the people is in them-people who fled from the plains of Haiti, to win and hold their freedom in the mountains. I heard a marvelous native drummer, Ti Ro Ro, who seemed to be drumming with his soul, as he crouched over the carved, hollow log, his hands flashing in the rhythm of the "Freedom Dance," interpreted by two talented young dancers of great promise-one Haitian and one American. If our young maestro captures this "freedom theme" with his drums, he will be making still another contribution to the cause of civil rights so dear to all true American hearts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Lionel Hampton Beats Out New Rhythm for Civil Rights Fight

Black Sacred Music , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 1993

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Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-7.1.36
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lionel Hampton Beats Out New Rhythm for Civil Rights Fight Mary McLeod Bethun e I am told that Lionel Hampton, the little orchestra leader who keeps our feet tapping with his drums and xylophones, has developed a new theme in jazz-a theme based on the beat of the tom-toms of Africa. And my mind picks up the same stirring beat as it came down to me, this summer, from the Haitian hills-brought forth by the black mountaineers of Haiti, beating with their bare hands on their native drums. One does not forget the roll of these drums-the character of the people is in them-people who fled from the plains of Haiti, to win and hold their freedom in the mountains. I heard a marvelous native drummer, Ti Ro Ro, who seemed to be drumming with his soul, as he crouched over the carved, hollow log, his hands flashing in the rhythm of the "Freedom Dance," interpreted by two talented young dancers of great promise-one Haitian and one American. If our young maestro captures this "freedom theme" with his drums, he will be making still another contribution to the cause of civil rights so dear to all true American hearts

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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