Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice

Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice Comparative Literature 68:3 © 2016 by University of Oregon Comparative Literature COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 352 resonance in the Venetian context. A keyword she often recurs to is tempo, which in Italian means both time and weather, a handy reminder of the reciprocal influence of geo-climatic conditions and the rhythm of everyday life that characterizes the Venetian chronotope. The Introduction sets out to map the ambiguities of Venice as a liminal place between earth and water, Europe and Asia, the familiar and the strange. Moreover, the very fabric of the city, built over disparate islands and lacking an overall plan, is found to be "discontinuous" (a term dear to Calvino) and tantalizingly maze-like. These oft-quoted tropes are made concrete by a wealth of information on the specific historical, economic, and political factors that determined the structure and organization of this extraordinary city. But Killing the Moonlight is not a social history. This thick context is brought to bear on an impressive range of literary and artistic artefacts that Scappettone discusses in depth and with brilliant insight. Refreshingly, architectural discourse and practice are mobilized to support her argument that "Venice continues to stand as a contradiction to the rational design http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice

Comparative Literature , Volume 68 (3) – Sep 1, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/killing-the-moonlight-modernism-in-venice-JjbH59TXEu
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3631609
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparative Literature 68:3 © 2016 by University of Oregon Comparative Literature COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 352 resonance in the Venetian context. A keyword she often recurs to is tempo, which in Italian means both time and weather, a handy reminder of the reciprocal influence of geo-climatic conditions and the rhythm of everyday life that characterizes the Venetian chronotope. The Introduction sets out to map the ambiguities of Venice as a liminal place between earth and water, Europe and Asia, the familiar and the strange. Moreover, the very fabric of the city, built over disparate islands and lacking an overall plan, is found to be "discontinuous" (a term dear to Calvino) and tantalizingly maze-like. These oft-quoted tropes are made concrete by a wealth of information on the specific historical, economic, and political factors that determined the structure and organization of this extraordinary city. But Killing the Moonlight is not a social history. This thick context is brought to bear on an impressive range of literary and artistic artefacts that Scappettone discusses in depth and with brilliant insight. Refreshingly, architectural discourse and practice are mobilized to support her argument that "Venice continues to stand as a contradiction to the rational design

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.