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JACOBI: Realist, Romanticist, and Beacon for Our Time

JACOBI: Realist, Romanticist, and Beacon for Our Time S y m p o s i u m : D e v a l u e d C u r r e n c y, P a r t 2 JACOBI Realist, Romanticist, and Beacon for Our Time Frank Ankersmit I am a realist, as no one ever was before me. — Jacobi (1869) Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, friend of Goethe and critic of Kant, was born in Düsseldorf in 1743 and died in Eutin near Munich in 1819.1 He lived to witness the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang, the birth of German idealism and the tremendous impact of Kant’s critical philosophy, the birth and spread of Romanticism, then last but not least the French Revolution (in whose wake he lost house and property).2 Jacobi established his fame as both a novelist and a philosopher with two epistolary novels, Eduard Allwills Papiere (1775 – 56) and Woldemar (1779), in which he provided the proto-Romantic Sturm und Drang with a sound and convincing philosophical program. This record goes a long 1. Epigraph is from Aus F. H. Jacobis Nachlass. Hrsg. Von R. Zoeppritz (Leipzig: Engelmann, 1869), 239. The edition that I cite throughout is Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, Werke, ed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

JACOBI: Realist, Romanticist, and Beacon for Our Time

Common Knowledge , Volume 14 (2) – Apr 1, 2008

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2008 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
0961-754X
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-2007-070
Publisher site
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Abstract

S y m p o s i u m : D e v a l u e d C u r r e n c y, P a r t 2 JACOBI Realist, Romanticist, and Beacon for Our Time Frank Ankersmit I am a realist, as no one ever was before me. — Jacobi (1869) Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, friend of Goethe and critic of Kant, was born in Düsseldorf in 1743 and died in Eutin near Munich in 1819.1 He lived to witness the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang, the birth of German idealism and the tremendous impact of Kant’s critical philosophy, the birth and spread of Romanticism, then last but not least the French Revolution (in whose wake he lost house and property).2 Jacobi established his fame as both a novelist and a philosopher with two epistolary novels, Eduard Allwills Papiere (1775 – 56) and Woldemar (1779), in which he provided the proto-Romantic Sturm und Drang with a sound and convincing philosophical program. This record goes a long 1. Epigraph is from Aus F. H. Jacobis Nachlass. Hrsg. Von R. Zoeppritz (Leipzig: Engelmann, 1869), 239. The edition that I cite throughout is Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, Werke, ed.

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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