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INTRODUCTION: REGARDING CHANGE AT ISE JINGU

INTRODUCTION: REGARDING CHANGE AT ISE JINGU DEVALUED CURRENCY Elegiac Symposium on Paradigm Shifts Part 2 Jeffrey M. Perl, Frank Ankersmit, Peter Burke, Wayne Andersen, William M. Chace, Uta Gosmann, Jean Bethke Elshtain ¯ INTRODUCTION: REGARDING CHANGE AT ISE JINGU There is something — two or three things, actually — provincial about the idea of paradigm shifts. In its heyday, the notion of incommensurable paradigms was useful in defense of local cultures against encroachments from the outside. Anthropologists and historians in particular took to the notion as support for the happy thought that outlandish systems of belief could not be judged with reference to any universal standard. The leading candidate for universal standard (Science) was understood as itself a province — a remote island continent, with its uniquely intimidating language, hermetic concepts, and incomparably fastidious manners. In the sense most relevant to this symposium, the idea of paradigm shifts is provincial in that it relates to a quintessentially modern and Western experience of continuity as monotony. Kuhn argued that changes so basic can ensue during a shift in paradigm that “what were ducks . . . before the revolution are rabbits afterwards.”1 He is not talking about a change in mere nomenclature 1. Thomas Kuhn, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

INTRODUCTION: REGARDING CHANGE AT ISE JINGU

Common Knowledge , Volume 14 (2) – Apr 1, 2008

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2008 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
0961-754X
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-2007-069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DEVALUED CURRENCY Elegiac Symposium on Paradigm Shifts Part 2 Jeffrey M. Perl, Frank Ankersmit, Peter Burke, Wayne Andersen, William M. Chace, Uta Gosmann, Jean Bethke Elshtain ¯ INTRODUCTION: REGARDING CHANGE AT ISE JINGU There is something — two or three things, actually — provincial about the idea of paradigm shifts. In its heyday, the notion of incommensurable paradigms was useful in defense of local cultures against encroachments from the outside. Anthropologists and historians in particular took to the notion as support for the happy thought that outlandish systems of belief could not be judged with reference to any universal standard. The leading candidate for universal standard (Science) was understood as itself a province — a remote island continent, with its uniquely intimidating language, hermetic concepts, and incomparably fastidious manners. In the sense most relevant to this symposium, the idea of paradigm shifts is provincial in that it relates to a quintessentially modern and Western experience of continuity as monotony. Kuhn argued that changes so basic can ensue during a shift in paradigm that “what were ducks . . . before the revolution are rabbits afterwards.”1 He is not talking about a change in mere nomenclature 1. Thomas Kuhn,

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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