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Introduction

Introduction Chris W. Gallagher, Deborah Minter, and Shari J. Stenberg This special issue assembles a diverse array of scholars to think through the timely question of what resilience means to our profession. What would it look like, and what would it take, to forge a resilient discipline, major or pro - gram or curriculum, writing center, pedagogy? How do local contexts shape the possibilities and limitations of resilient practices? Who reaps the rewards of resilience, and who shoulders its burdens? Is resilience even a viable and appropriate goal? If not, what are some alternative formulations? These questions take on a particular poignancy in what feels to many of us like an age of political, social, and natural disaster. Even as the found- a tions of democracy are under assault in Washington and in state houses, our universities are being reshaped by management practices rooted in corporate efficiency: strategic planning, cost cutting, outcomes assessment, and labor casualization. The humanities are under particularly acute pressure, as they face declining enrollments, institutional and cultural scrutiny (and often skepticism) about their market value, and a dire job market. Those of us who teach and study literature, language, writing, and culture are— as usual and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-7295849
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chris W. Gallagher, Deborah Minter, and Shari J. Stenberg This special issue assembles a diverse array of scholars to think through the timely question of what resilience means to our profession. What would it look like, and what would it take, to forge a resilient discipline, major or pro - gram or curriculum, writing center, pedagogy? How do local contexts shape the possibilities and limitations of resilient practices? Who reaps the rewards of resilience, and who shoulders its burdens? Is resilience even a viable and appropriate goal? If not, what are some alternative formulations? These questions take on a particular poignancy in what feels to many of us like an age of political, social, and natural disaster. Even as the found- a tions of democracy are under assault in Washington and in state houses, our universities are being reshaped by management practices rooted in corporate efficiency: strategic planning, cost cutting, outcomes assessment, and labor casualization. The humanities are under particularly acute pressure, as they face declining enrollments, institutional and cultural scrutiny (and often skepticism) about their market value, and a dire job market. Those of us who teach and study literature, language, writing, and culture are— as usual and

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2019

References