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Imperatives of Care: Women and Medicine in Colonial Korea

Imperatives of Care: Women and Medicine in Colonial Korea Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/article-pdf/27/1/111/1503300/111yang.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 19 April 2022 Kim, Imperatives of Care 111 recounting the foreign invasions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and perhaps most significant for Park’s argument regarding vernacularity, those describ- ing the now fluctuating hierarchies in Chosŏn’s once rigid social order. Chapter 3 tracks the linguistic features of the text. Through meticulous lexical and syntactical analysis, Park shows how No’s style, though written in Sinitic script, drew from a wide linguistic repertoire. It freely adopted Sinitic calques for native Korean words (e.g., representing words such as majigi, a measure for counting plots of land, with the characters 斗落, 130–31) and translated popular Korean sayings into Sinitic idioms. Chapter 4 follows the materiality and social life of the Tongp’ae naksong through its surviving manuscripts. Part of a scribal, rather than print, lit- erary culture, the stories of the Tongp’ae naksong found their way into other yadam collections it inspired. Overall, Park’s treatment of the Tongp’ae naksong dwells less on the stories themselves and more on metatextual matters. It pays close attention to paratexts, material conditions of creation, history of circulation, linguistic features, cultural and social context, and the positionality of its author. For http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Imperatives of Care: Women and Medicine in Colonial Korea

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Mar 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright © 2022 Journal of Korean Studies Inc.
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/07311613-9474331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/article-pdf/27/1/111/1503300/111yang.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 19 April 2022 Kim, Imperatives of Care 111 recounting the foreign invasions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and perhaps most significant for Park’s argument regarding vernacularity, those describ- ing the now fluctuating hierarchies in Chosŏn’s once rigid social order. Chapter 3 tracks the linguistic features of the text. Through meticulous lexical and syntactical analysis, Park shows how No’s style, though written in Sinitic script, drew from a wide linguistic repertoire. It freely adopted Sinitic calques for native Korean words (e.g., representing words such as majigi, a measure for counting plots of land, with the characters 斗落, 130–31) and translated popular Korean sayings into Sinitic idioms. Chapter 4 follows the materiality and social life of the Tongp’ae naksong through its surviving manuscripts. Part of a scribal, rather than print, lit- erary culture, the stories of the Tongp’ae naksong found their way into other yadam collections it inspired. Overall, Park’s treatment of the Tongp’ae naksong dwells less on the stories themselves and more on metatextual matters. It pays close attention to paratexts, material conditions of creation, history of circulation, linguistic features, cultural and social context, and the positionality of its author. For

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2022

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