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I'm Floating in the Air: Creation of a Korean Transnational Space among Korean-Latino American Remigrants

I'm Floating in the Air: Creation of a Korean Transnational Space among Korean-Latino American... O n 9 April 1995 I was watching the Korean-language T V program of Johnny Yun on channel 18 in Los Angeles. T h e comedian often upsets me with his English-tainted Korean and his obscene jokes. Nonetheless, his program is one of the few produced locally that is bilingual. He also features many non-Korean guests. Near the end of the show the guests, a Jewish filmmaker and a Korean singer, were asked to help with a raffle for airplane tickets to Korea. T h e winning number was recited, and a gentleman stood up. He was a bit dark, wearing summer shorts on a cold day, and looked to be in his late thirties. As usual the show’s host asked his name. Surprisingly, he did not answer in Korean but stated, ‘‘Jose Lee.” T h e host could not believe what he heard. “What . . . ? ” T h e n Mr. Yun quickly recovered. “Congratulations, Dr. Lee! Enjoy another trip to Korea .” positions 7:3 0 1999 by Duke University Press. In conducting research among Korean immigrants in N e w York City and Los Angeles, I encountered people similar to Jose Lee who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

I'm Floating in the Air: Creation of a Korean Transnational Space among Korean-Latino American Remigrants

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (3) – Dec 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-3-667
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

O n 9 April 1995 I was watching the Korean-language T V program of Johnny Yun on channel 18 in Los Angeles. T h e comedian often upsets me with his English-tainted Korean and his obscene jokes. Nonetheless, his program is one of the few produced locally that is bilingual. He also features many non-Korean guests. Near the end of the show the guests, a Jewish filmmaker and a Korean singer, were asked to help with a raffle for airplane tickets to Korea. T h e winning number was recited, and a gentleman stood up. He was a bit dark, wearing summer shorts on a cold day, and looked to be in his late thirties. As usual the show’s host asked his name. Surprisingly, he did not answer in Korean but stated, ‘‘Jose Lee.” T h e host could not believe what he heard. “What . . . ? ” T h e n Mr. Yun quickly recovered. “Congratulations, Dr. Lee! Enjoy another trip to Korea .” positions 7:3 0 1999 by Duke University Press. In conducting research among Korean immigrants in N e w York City and Los Angeles, I encountered people similar to Jose Lee who

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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