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Hybrid Modernisms in Greece and Argentina: The Case of Cavafy, Borges, Kalokyris, and Kyriakidis

Hybrid Modernisms in Greece and Argentina: The Case of Cavafy, Borges, Kalokyris, and Kyriakidis HOUGH GEOGRAPHICALLY REMOTE from each other, Greece and Argentina have followed parallel political, socio-economic, and cultural trajectories in the last two centuries. In both, the notions of culture and nation are virtually inseparable, while literature frequently undertakes the task to define, defend, or contest national identities such as “ελληνικοvτητα” (“Greekness”) and “argentinidad” (“Argentineness”). Furthermore, in the literature of these countries, the discourse of nationalism is blended with Western modernist, avant-gardist, and postmodernist aesthetics, thus producing highly hybridized and syncretic narratives, which mix up heterogeneous, multitemporal, and quite often contradictory discourses and traditions. I use the terms syncretism and hybridity interchangeably in order to provide a bridge between what is a standard (or even orthodox) epistemological framework in Latin American studies (hybridity) and one that is more frequent in Modern Greek studies (syncretism). In the first part of this article, I provide a brief overview of the modernist movements in Argentina and Greece in the 1920s and 1930s, respectively, movements that have had a profound and long-lasting impact on the literature of the two countries. This is necessary for two reasons: on the one hand, to highlight the hybrid nature of Argentine and Greek modernisms and, on the other, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Hybrid Modernisms in Greece and Argentina: The Case of Cavafy, Borges, Kalokyris, and Kyriakidis

Comparative Literature , Volume 58 (2) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2006 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/-58-2-113
Publisher site
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Abstract

HOUGH GEOGRAPHICALLY REMOTE from each other, Greece and Argentina have followed parallel political, socio-economic, and cultural trajectories in the last two centuries. In both, the notions of culture and nation are virtually inseparable, while literature frequently undertakes the task to define, defend, or contest national identities such as “ελληνικοvτητα” (“Greekness”) and “argentinidad” (“Argentineness”). Furthermore, in the literature of these countries, the discourse of nationalism is blended with Western modernist, avant-gardist, and postmodernist aesthetics, thus producing highly hybridized and syncretic narratives, which mix up heterogeneous, multitemporal, and quite often contradictory discourses and traditions. I use the terms syncretism and hybridity interchangeably in order to provide a bridge between what is a standard (or even orthodox) epistemological framework in Latin American studies (hybridity) and one that is more frequent in Modern Greek studies (syncretism). In the first part of this article, I provide a brief overview of the modernist movements in Argentina and Greece in the 1920s and 1930s, respectively, movements that have had a profound and long-lasting impact on the literature of the two countries. This is necessary for two reasons: on the one hand, to highlight the hybrid nature of Argentine and Greek modernisms and, on the other,

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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