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Huddling under the Imperial Umbrella: A Korean Approach to Ming China in the Early 1500s

Huddling under the Imperial Umbrella: A Korean Approach to Ming China in the Early 1500s By examining the frequency and purpose of voluntary missions of congratulations to Beijing in the early 1500s, this article explores the changing Chosŏn attitude towards Ming China and interprets the close and mutually beneficial relationship between King Chungjong (r. 1506–45) and the Jiajing Emperor (r. 1521–66). Installed as a nominal king by coup leaders under the situation in which the Korean elites’ view of “serving Ming China” was in transition from conditional and practical to unconditional and ideological, and threatened by both the merit subjects’ arbitrariness and Confucian moralists’ fundamentalism, Chungjong was very eager to link himself more intimately with the Ming emperor, the higher authority, from which he received investiture. To the Jiajing Emperor, who frequently provoked his officials with a variety of ritual controversies, the congratulatory missions from Chosŏn, the Eastern Land of Propriety, were welcome guests. The emperor and the king became intimate with each other in this way for the sake of their own political purposes, and their relationship inevitably influenced the relations between the two countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Huddling under the Imperial Umbrella: A Korean Approach to Ming China in the Early 1500s

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 15 (1) – Sep 10, 2010

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Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/07311613-15-1-41
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By examining the frequency and purpose of voluntary missions of congratulations to Beijing in the early 1500s, this article explores the changing Chosŏn attitude towards Ming China and interprets the close and mutually beneficial relationship between King Chungjong (r. 1506–45) and the Jiajing Emperor (r. 1521–66). Installed as a nominal king by coup leaders under the situation in which the Korean elites’ view of “serving Ming China” was in transition from conditional and practical to unconditional and ideological, and threatened by both the merit subjects’ arbitrariness and Confucian moralists’ fundamentalism, Chungjong was very eager to link himself more intimately with the Ming emperor, the higher authority, from which he received investiture. To the Jiajing Emperor, who frequently provoked his officials with a variety of ritual controversies, the congratulatory missions from Chosŏn, the Eastern Land of Propriety, were welcome guests. The emperor and the king became intimate with each other in this way for the sake of their own political purposes, and their relationship inevitably influenced the relations between the two countries.

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 10, 2010

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