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Horror

Horror Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/14/2/367/1613821/367wald.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 August 2022 LIVI NG LEXI CON F OR THE E NV I R ONMENTA L HU MAN I T I ES JONATHAN WALD Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Canada s wildfires raged in California during the summer of 2020, the United States Na- A tional Weather Service (NWS) created a new warning category: “fire tornado.” Heat from the fires created powerful updrafts that drew in colder air, creating intensely hot burning vortexes. Disturbing events like this are becoming increasingly common- place during the climate crisis. However, the climate crisis includes more than increas- ing temperatures and fire. It also includes Florida’s abnormally cold temperatures earlier in 2020, which prompted the NWS to warn of hypothermic iguanas tumbling out of trees. What kind of monstrous story includes both fire tornadoes and frozen lizards? The eruption of these “highly improbable” events forces a reconsideration of real- ism as a genre for making sense of the world. We can no longer rely on the “ordinary” or “predictable” as markers of reality, but perhaps we can find more adequate narratives within the genre of horror. The steady emergence of the “eco-horror” genre in particular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Humanities Duke University Press

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Copyright
© 2022 Jonathan Wald
ISSN
2201-1919
eISSN
2201-1919
DOI
10.1215/22011919-9712434
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/14/2/367/1613821/367wald.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 August 2022 LIVI NG LEXI CON F OR THE E NV I R ONMENTA L HU MAN I T I ES JONATHAN WALD Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Canada s wildfires raged in California during the summer of 2020, the United States Na- A tional Weather Service (NWS) created a new warning category: “fire tornado.” Heat from the fires created powerful updrafts that drew in colder air, creating intensely hot burning vortexes. Disturbing events like this are becoming increasingly common- place during the climate crisis. However, the climate crisis includes more than increas- ing temperatures and fire. It also includes Florida’s abnormally cold temperatures earlier in 2020, which prompted the NWS to warn of hypothermic iguanas tumbling out of trees. What kind of monstrous story includes both fire tornadoes and frozen lizards? The eruption of these “highly improbable” events forces a reconsideration of real- ism as a genre for making sense of the world. We can no longer rely on the “ordinary” or “predictable” as markers of reality, but perhaps we can find more adequate narratives within the genre of horror. The steady emergence of the “eco-horror” genre in particular

Journal

Environmental HumanitiesDuke University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2022

References