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Helping to Lay Foundation for Negro Music of the Future

Helping to Lay Foundation for Negro Music of the Future Helping to Lay Foundation for Negro Music of the Future To those of us who believe with Dvorak that "the future music of this country must be founded on what is called Negro melodies" it is gratifying to see the large number of composers who have recently turned to the use of Indian and Negro folk tunes, if not as actual themes, as the acknowledged source of their musical inspiration. In this country we are, musically, in much the same position as a man who owns a valuable mine. The fact that there are minerals in the ground, that he has that great supply of wealth stored up, will mean little to the owner unless he utilizes it. We have this wonderful store of folk music-the melodies of an enslaved people, who poured out their longings, their griefs and their aspirations in the one great, uni­ versal language. But this store will be of no value unless we utilize it, unless we treat it in such manner that it can be presented in choral form, in lyric and operatic works, in concertos and suites and salon music- unless our musical architects take the rough timber of Negro themes and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Helping to Lay Foundation for Negro Music of the Future

Black Sacred Music , Volume 5 (2) – Sep 1, 1991

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Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.2.20
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Helping to Lay Foundation for Negro Music of the Future To those of us who believe with Dvorak that "the future music of this country must be founded on what is called Negro melodies" it is gratifying to see the large number of composers who have recently turned to the use of Indian and Negro folk tunes, if not as actual themes, as the acknowledged source of their musical inspiration. In this country we are, musically, in much the same position as a man who owns a valuable mine. The fact that there are minerals in the ground, that he has that great supply of wealth stored up, will mean little to the owner unless he utilizes it. We have this wonderful store of folk music-the melodies of an enslaved people, who poured out their longings, their griefs and their aspirations in the one great, uni­ versal language. But this store will be of no value unless we utilize it, unless we treat it in such manner that it can be presented in choral form, in lyric and operatic works, in concertos and suites and salon music- unless our musical architects take the rough timber of Negro themes and

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1991

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