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HEAVENLY DISSONANCES: THE CADENTIAL SIX-FOUR CHORD IN FRENCH GRANDS MOTETS AND RAMEAU'S THEORY OF THE ACCORD PAR SUPPOSITION

HEAVENLY DISSONANCES: THE CADENTIAL SIX-FOUR CHORD IN FRENCH GRANDS MOTETS AND RAMEAU'S THEORY OF... The cadential formulae as exemplified in this music are elementary in nature. In the majority of cases the tonic 6 appears just prior to the domi4 nant which, quite naturally, falls to the tonic in root position. In most instances, some type of subdominantal structure, usually a seventh chord on supertonic, precedes the second inversion of tonic. Since repetition of this harmonic cadence structure undoubtedly proved dull through constant usage, it should be recognized that ornamentation provided the medium through which boredom was avoided. There is scarcely a cadence that does not carry above it the indication for at least one ornament, and in many cases a complex combination appears. Even when there are no signs for the agrements at cadence points, it is altogether likely that performers would have used them through habit and training. Therefore, it is particularly requisite that dutiful attention be devoted to the embellishments inasmuch as the very harmonic bareness of the music was intended to be spiced by multiple passing tones, suspensions, appoggiaturas, trills, anticipations, et cetera. (Richards 1950, 1: 97–98) According to Richards, most of the “embellishments” of the cadential six-four were mere improvised agréments. In his 1962 dissertation, Conan Jennings http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

HEAVENLY DISSONANCES: THE CADENTIAL SIX-FOUR CHORD IN FRENCH GRANDS MOTETS AND RAMEAU'S THEORY OF THE ACCORD PAR SUPPOSITION

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-47-2-305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The cadential formulae as exemplified in this music are elementary in nature. In the majority of cases the tonic 6 appears just prior to the domi4 nant which, quite naturally, falls to the tonic in root position. In most instances, some type of subdominantal structure, usually a seventh chord on supertonic, precedes the second inversion of tonic. Since repetition of this harmonic cadence structure undoubtedly proved dull through constant usage, it should be recognized that ornamentation provided the medium through which boredom was avoided. There is scarcely a cadence that does not carry above it the indication for at least one ornament, and in many cases a complex combination appears. Even when there are no signs for the agrements at cadence points, it is altogether likely that performers would have used them through habit and training. Therefore, it is particularly requisite that dutiful attention be devoted to the embellishments inasmuch as the very harmonic bareness of the music was intended to be spiced by multiple passing tones, suspensions, appoggiaturas, trills, anticipations, et cetera. (Richards 1950, 1: 97–98) According to Richards, most of the “embellishments” of the cadential six-four were mere improvised agréments. In his 1962 dissertation, Conan Jennings

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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