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Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddhism: Balancing Sectarianism and Ecumenism

Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddhism: Balancing Sectarianism and Ecumenism The Journal of Korean Studies Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddhism: Balancing Sec­ tarianism and Ecumenism by Chanju Mun. Honolulu: Blue Pine Books, 2009. 494 pp. $40.00 (paper) The fundamental premise of Chanju Mun's book Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddh ism is that despite the strong Japanese imprint on the Korean Bud­ dhist tradition during the twentieth century, the larger history of this tradition should be understood as essentially working through a dialectical relationship between Son (Zen) sectarianism and general Buddhist ecumenism. Mun pro­ poses that these two strands of thought-more precisely lineages of practical approaches to Buddhist soteriology-came together in Reverend Ha Tongsan (18 90-1965), who was an influential abbot of Pomo Monastery in Pusan, patri­ arch of the order of celibate Korean monks (1954-1955, 1958-19 62), and a driv­ ing force behind the Buddhist Purifi cation Movement (1954 -1962) to rid the Korean Son tradition of the taint of Japanese-style Buddhist practices that had been imposed from 1910 to 1945. Mun's book is divided into three parts, plus a lengthy introduction (pp. 1-54) that attempts to chart and define Korea's sectarian Buddhist tradition as a result oflineage affiliation. Part I (pp. 55-171) is comprised of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddhism: Balancing Sectarianism and Ecumenism

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 15 (1) – Sep 10, 2010

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Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/07311613-15-1-126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal of Korean Studies Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddhism: Balancing Sec­ tarianism and Ecumenism by Chanju Mun. Honolulu: Blue Pine Books, 2009. 494 pp. $40.00 (paper) The fundamental premise of Chanju Mun's book Ha Dongsan and Colonial Korean Buddh ism is that despite the strong Japanese imprint on the Korean Bud­ dhist tradition during the twentieth century, the larger history of this tradition should be understood as essentially working through a dialectical relationship between Son (Zen) sectarianism and general Buddhist ecumenism. Mun pro­ poses that these two strands of thought-more precisely lineages of practical approaches to Buddhist soteriology-came together in Reverend Ha Tongsan (18 90-1965), who was an influential abbot of Pomo Monastery in Pusan, patri­ arch of the order of celibate Korean monks (1954-1955, 1958-19 62), and a driv­ ing force behind the Buddhist Purifi cation Movement (1954 -1962) to rid the Korean Son tradition of the taint of Japanese-style Buddhist practices that had been imposed from 1910 to 1945. Mun's book is divided into three parts, plus a lengthy introduction (pp. 1-54) that attempts to chart and define Korea's sectarian Buddhist tradition as a result oflineage affiliation. Part I (pp. 55-171) is comprised of a

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 10, 2010

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