Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840 Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/27/3/488/1301576/488shapira.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 resources for thinking about social change and collective action — for addressing the “us” of the title— but these go largely unexplored. But perhaps I expect too much from Critchley’s “us.” Though its jaunty, conversational style seems to invite a wide readership, the book’s coverage is somewhat too idiosyncratic to serve as a student’s introduction to Greek tragedy or to Greek philosophical writing about tragedy. At the same time, it is too super - c fi ial to shed any new light for a specialist, and probably too detailed to make for an effective popularizing treatment. A better title might have been “tragedy, the Greeks, and me,” for the book gives us Simon Critchley’s tragedy and Simon Critchley’s Greeks. There is nothing wrong with either of these. But “we” need more from tragedy and from the Greeks. — J oshua Billings doi 10.1215/0961754X-9268277 Dale Townshend, Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760 – 1840 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 432 pp. For scholars of the Gothic, thinking about buildings and books together is an ingrained habit. Not only did Gothic fiction emerge alongside the Gothic archi- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840

Common Knowledge , Volume 27 (3) – Aug 1, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/gothic-antiquity-history-romance-and-the-architectural-imagination-N5Cnjhx8jp
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754x-9268291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/27/3/488/1301576/488shapira.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 resources for thinking about social change and collective action — for addressing the “us” of the title— but these go largely unexplored. But perhaps I expect too much from Critchley’s “us.” Though its jaunty, conversational style seems to invite a wide readership, the book’s coverage is somewhat too idiosyncratic to serve as a student’s introduction to Greek tragedy or to Greek philosophical writing about tragedy. At the same time, it is too super - c fi ial to shed any new light for a specialist, and probably too detailed to make for an effective popularizing treatment. A better title might have been “tragedy, the Greeks, and me,” for the book gives us Simon Critchley’s tragedy and Simon Critchley’s Greeks. There is nothing wrong with either of these. But “we” need more from tragedy and from the Greeks. — J oshua Billings doi 10.1215/0961754X-9268277 Dale Townshend, Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760 – 1840 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 432 pp. For scholars of the Gothic, thinking about buildings and books together is an ingrained habit. Not only did Gothic fiction emerge alongside the Gothic archi-

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2021

There are no references for this article.