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Good-bye Kitty, Hello War: The Tactics of Spectacle and New Youth Movements in Urban Japan

Good-bye Kitty, Hello War: The Tactics of Spectacle and New Youth Movements in Urban Japan positions 13:1 Spring 2005 Figure 1 A flyer announcing the antiwar/reclaim the streets demonstration in Kyoto, October 19, 2003. The character pictured is modeled on Otabe-chan, a character from a well-known Kyoto sweetshop and an apprentice geisha (maiko) who advertises a famous local sweet. Her come-hither glance at tourists is transposed here into an invitation to move from store to street to join the protest. These rave demo protests, which have been going on since early 2003, have used different strategies to reclaim in each city a space thoroughly saturated by consumer culture and populated by youth. The strategies for these protests differ from strategies for other antiwar and antiglobalization protests whose internationalism is signaled by the presence and pressure of transnational NGOs and by communication in English in parallel with communication in Japanese. While using media tactically, rave demos experiment with new forms of music (anarchic noise and techno beats) and media (3–D videos projected onto the sides of buildings through the course of a rave demo). Organizers have attempted to mix art and activism in public spaces of Tokyo and Kyoto to convince their own demographic of youth culture of two things, in a manner that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Good-bye Kitty, Hello War: The Tactics of Spectacle and New Youth Movements in Urban Japan

positions asia critique , Volume 13 (1) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-13-1-87
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 13:1 Spring 2005 Figure 1 A flyer announcing the antiwar/reclaim the streets demonstration in Kyoto, October 19, 2003. The character pictured is modeled on Otabe-chan, a character from a well-known Kyoto sweetshop and an apprentice geisha (maiko) who advertises a famous local sweet. Her come-hither glance at tourists is transposed here into an invitation to move from store to street to join the protest. These rave demo protests, which have been going on since early 2003, have used different strategies to reclaim in each city a space thoroughly saturated by consumer culture and populated by youth. The strategies for these protests differ from strategies for other antiwar and antiglobalization protests whose internationalism is signaled by the presence and pressure of transnational NGOs and by communication in English in parallel with communication in Japanese. While using media tactically, rave demos experiment with new forms of music (anarchic noise and techno beats) and media (3–D videos projected onto the sides of buildings through the course of a rave demo). Organizers have attempted to mix art and activism in public spaces of Tokyo and Kyoto to convince their own demographic of youth culture of two things, in a manner that

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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