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Global Civil Society Remakes History: "The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal 2000"

Global Civil Society Remakes History: "The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal 2000" that continues throughout the world to this day.2 I am a second-generation zainichi, a resident Korean in Japan, and have been deeply involved in organizing the Tribunal from the outset as one of the principal members of the research team of VAWW-NET Japan.3 The following report on the Tribunal is based on my personal involvement and perspective. The hall was filled to overcapacity for all five days of the event. Sixty-four survivors from nine countries (South Korea, North Korea, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, the Philippines, the Netherlands, Indonesia, East Timor, and Japan) were in attendance. Prosecution teams from each country, an international audience of one thousand, and around three hundred journalists from Japan and abroad filled every corner of the hall. On 8 December the judges declared the opening of the trial, and the two chief prosecutors read the common indictment.4 Following them were presentations by the prosecution teams of each of the nine represented countries. Each presentation included testimonies by the survivors, the submission of documentary evidence, and cross-examination by the panel of judges. In addition, expert witnesses and former Japanese soldiers who served in the war provided testimonies. The case for the defendant—the Japanese http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Global Civil Society Remakes History: "The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal 2000"

positions asia critique , Volume 9 (3) – Dec 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-9-3-611
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

that continues throughout the world to this day.2 I am a second-generation zainichi, a resident Korean in Japan, and have been deeply involved in organizing the Tribunal from the outset as one of the principal members of the research team of VAWW-NET Japan.3 The following report on the Tribunal is based on my personal involvement and perspective. The hall was filled to overcapacity for all five days of the event. Sixty-four survivors from nine countries (South Korea, North Korea, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, the Philippines, the Netherlands, Indonesia, East Timor, and Japan) were in attendance. Prosecution teams from each country, an international audience of one thousand, and around three hundred journalists from Japan and abroad filled every corner of the hall. On 8 December the judges declared the opening of the trial, and the two chief prosecutors read the common indictment.4 Following them were presentations by the prosecution teams of each of the nine represented countries. Each presentation included testimonies by the survivors, the submission of documentary evidence, and cross-examination by the panel of judges. In addition, expert witnesses and former Japanese soldiers who served in the war provided testimonies. The case for the defendant—the Japanese

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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