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Future

Future Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/8/2/240/409437/240Granjou.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 31 March 2022 LIVING LEXICON F O R T HE E N VIRONME N TA L H U M AN IT IES CÉLINE GRANJOU IRSTEA, University of Grenoble-Alps, Grenoble, France JUAN FRANCISCO S ALAZAR School of Humanities and Communication Arts and Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University, Australia he future has long been viewed in terms of modernity’s human-centered categories T of innovation, emancipation, progress, and civilization (which have historically been predominantly coded as white and male), while nature has been shoved to the realm of the ahistorical, understood as a fixed background for the development of soci- ety. These categories entail the subterfuge that the future is always “ours” to shape and build. They are deeply rooted in the transformation of the Christian doctrine of the Apocalypse during the early Renaissance, which carried the shift from a belief in humankind’s future redemption by God to the secular ideology of progress that as- sumed that humans themselves actively contribute to the shaping of a better future. This ideology was embodied in Francis Bacon’s view of scientific advancement, as in Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s view of history as a teleological http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Humanities Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Céline Granjou and Juan Francisco Salazar
ISSN
2201-1919
eISSN
2201-1919
DOI
10.1215/22011919-3664342
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/8/2/240/409437/240Granjou.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 31 March 2022 LIVING LEXICON F O R T HE E N VIRONME N TA L H U M AN IT IES CÉLINE GRANJOU IRSTEA, University of Grenoble-Alps, Grenoble, France JUAN FRANCISCO S ALAZAR School of Humanities and Communication Arts and Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University, Australia he future has long been viewed in terms of modernity’s human-centered categories T of innovation, emancipation, progress, and civilization (which have historically been predominantly coded as white and male), while nature has been shoved to the realm of the ahistorical, understood as a fixed background for the development of soci- ety. These categories entail the subterfuge that the future is always “ours” to shape and build. They are deeply rooted in the transformation of the Christian doctrine of the Apocalypse during the early Renaissance, which carried the shift from a belief in humankind’s future redemption by God to the secular ideology of progress that as- sumed that humans themselves actively contribute to the shaping of a better future. This ideology was embodied in Francis Bacon’s view of scientific advancement, as in Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s view of history as a teleological

Journal

Environmental HumanitiesDuke University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2016

References