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Framing Time: New Women and the Cinematic Representation of Colonial Modernity in 1930s Shanghai

Framing Time: New Women and the Cinematic Representation of Colonial Modernity in 1930s Shanghai positions 15:3 doi 10.1215/10679847-2007-005 Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press positions 15:3 Winter 2007 bowel movement are the first tasks.” Others offer directives: “While in the office, concentrate only on work,” and, “Life is finite but knowledge is infinite; everyday after dinner and before bed, one must read books for at least an hour in order to keep oneself abreast of the progress of time.”1 There are at least three ways of understanding this photo spread. First, urban life is about time, about the regulation and organization of daily life; everyday practice follows a predetermined schedule, and each and every activity is designed to fulfill a specific purpose, from personal hygiene to health, work and family, and, eventually to modern living at large. Second, those daily activities are intimately linked to technology; the photos prominently feature objects of modern advancement, such as newspapers, automobiles, telephones, electric lights, radios, and, last but not least, the photographic apparatus itself that makes those images possible in the first place. Third, this representation draws attention to its own production and circulation as a part of the modern lifestyle, self-consciously highlighting the complex network of print culture that shapes understandings of modernity in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Framing Time: New Women and the Cinematic Representation of Colonial Modernity in 1930s Shanghai

positions asia critique , Volume 15 (3) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2007-005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 15:3 doi 10.1215/10679847-2007-005 Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press positions 15:3 Winter 2007 bowel movement are the first tasks.” Others offer directives: “While in the office, concentrate only on work,” and, “Life is finite but knowledge is infinite; everyday after dinner and before bed, one must read books for at least an hour in order to keep oneself abreast of the progress of time.”1 There are at least three ways of understanding this photo spread. First, urban life is about time, about the regulation and organization of daily life; everyday practice follows a predetermined schedule, and each and every activity is designed to fulfill a specific purpose, from personal hygiene to health, work and family, and, eventually to modern living at large. Second, those daily activities are intimately linked to technology; the photos prominently feature objects of modern advancement, such as newspapers, automobiles, telephones, electric lights, radios, and, last but not least, the photographic apparatus itself that makes those images possible in the first place. Third, this representation draws attention to its own production and circulation as a part of the modern lifestyle, self-consciously highlighting the complex network of print culture that shapes understandings of modernity in

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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