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For the Record: An Antiwar Protest in Jakarta Days before the Bali Bomb Attacks (A Photo-Essay)

For the Record: An Antiwar Protest in Jakarta Days before the Bali Bomb Attacks (A Photo-Essay) Figure 2 Nong Darol Mahmada, a member of the Liberal Islam Network (Jaringan Islam Liberal), was a key organizer of the demonstration. She endured a wait of a few hours, unsure if the expected interreligious coalition would come together as she hoped and if the busloads of students already on their way would make it through the city’s notorious jams. While the interreligious representation was not as strong as it could have been, in the end the students did arrive and the march on the U.S. Embassy began. Figure 3 The demonstration enjoyed a police escort during its journey of some forty minutes through some of Jakarta’s busiest districts. More than two hundred people came together as the marchers approached the U.S. Embassy and were funneled through a line consisting of police officers on one side and journalists and onlookers on the other. Figure 4 The protesters made clear their indignation at the Bush White House and their affection for Americans as a people. Peaceful resolutions rest more firmly on greater numbers of Muslims seeing the difference between regimes such as the Bush White House and a diverse citizenry. Figure 5 The U.S. Embassy was heavily guarded. Traffic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

For the Record: An Antiwar Protest in Jakarta Days before the Bali Bomb Attacks (A Photo-Essay)

positions asia critique , Volume 13 (1) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-13-1-115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Figure 2 Nong Darol Mahmada, a member of the Liberal Islam Network (Jaringan Islam Liberal), was a key organizer of the demonstration. She endured a wait of a few hours, unsure if the expected interreligious coalition would come together as she hoped and if the busloads of students already on their way would make it through the city’s notorious jams. While the interreligious representation was not as strong as it could have been, in the end the students did arrive and the march on the U.S. Embassy began. Figure 3 The demonstration enjoyed a police escort during its journey of some forty minutes through some of Jakarta’s busiest districts. More than two hundred people came together as the marchers approached the U.S. Embassy and were funneled through a line consisting of police officers on one side and journalists and onlookers on the other. Figure 4 The protesters made clear their indignation at the Bush White House and their affection for Americans as a people. Peaceful resolutions rest more firmly on greater numbers of Muslims seeing the difference between regimes such as the Bush White House and a diverse citizenry. Figure 5 The U.S. Embassy was heavily guarded. Traffic

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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