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For Finer Negro Music

For Finer Negro Music No matter where I go, no matter to whom I talk, I am always asking for a better opportunity for the musical development of the Negro in America. For years it has been my constant plea that young persons especially be given every chance to go ahead, to study in the best schools under the finest teachers, to build up reputations for them­ selves based upon solid achievement, so that in years to come the whole world will look up to them as worthwhile, cultured citizens and artists. One big trouble, I have found, is that Negroes apparently do not realize that if they are to participate in the nation's cultural activi­ ties, they must first become a tangible part of the nation's cultural life. There are many young colored musicians who need a chance to play with America's great symphony orchestras; there are many tal­ ented composers among us whose work should be given a hearing by large musical organizations. These chances seldom come. But they would come often if colored people in every city banded together and contributed a small sum of money every year to their local sym­ phony orchestra. You would soon see a difference http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

For Finer Negro Music

Black Sacred Music , Volume 6 (2) – Sep 1, 1992

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Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-6.2.95
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

No matter where I go, no matter to whom I talk, I am always asking for a better opportunity for the musical development of the Negro in America. For years it has been my constant plea that young persons especially be given every chance to go ahead, to study in the best schools under the finest teachers, to build up reputations for them­ selves based upon solid achievement, so that in years to come the whole world will look up to them as worthwhile, cultured citizens and artists. One big trouble, I have found, is that Negroes apparently do not realize that if they are to participate in the nation's cultural activi­ ties, they must first become a tangible part of the nation's cultural life. There are many young colored musicians who need a chance to play with America's great symphony orchestras; there are many tal­ ented composers among us whose work should be given a hearing by large musical organizations. These chances seldom come. But they would come often if colored people in every city banded together and contributed a small sum of money every year to their local sym­ phony orchestra. You would soon see a difference

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1992

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