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Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America

Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America DOI 10.1215/00104124-3327622 Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America. By Mike Chasar. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. 302 p. Ezra Pound, never short on advice, once admonished artists to "consider the way of the scientists rather than the way of an advertising agent for a new soap" (qtd. in Chasar 126). In Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America, Mike Chasar actively eschews Pound's counsel and, in so doing, offers an alternative perspective on the history of modern poetry that was written in Pound's name. The book's basic premise is that the citizens of modern America were "crazy for poetry"; they "wrote and published it, read it as part of everyday life, bought it, collected and shared it, and afforded it a great deal of prestige for its many aesthetic, emotional, social, political, and even commercial ways of connecting" (2). Everyday Reading unearths and takes seriously the work of these "everyday readers," who, Chasar convincingly argues, helped create the field of modern poetry against the backdrop of marked changes in U.S. culture industries and the national economy. At the same time, it demonstrates how these shifts constituted the ground for the development of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America

Comparative Literature , Volume 67 (4) – Dec 1, 2015

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3327637
Publisher site
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Abstract

DOI 10.1215/00104124-3327622 Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America. By Mike Chasar. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. 302 p. Ezra Pound, never short on advice, once admonished artists to "consider the way of the scientists rather than the way of an advertising agent for a new soap" (qtd. in Chasar 126). In Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America, Mike Chasar actively eschews Pound's counsel and, in so doing, offers an alternative perspective on the history of modern poetry that was written in Pound's name. The book's basic premise is that the citizens of modern America were "crazy for poetry"; they "wrote and published it, read it as part of everyday life, bought it, collected and shared it, and afforded it a great deal of prestige for its many aesthetic, emotional, social, political, and even commercial ways of connecting" (2). Everyday Reading unearths and takes seriously the work of these "everyday readers," who, Chasar convincingly argues, helped create the field of modern poetry against the backdrop of marked changes in U.S. culture industries and the national economy. At the same time, it demonstrates how these shifts constituted the ground for the development of

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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