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Evening's Empire: A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe

Evening's Empire: A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe doi 10.1215/0961754X-1815800 Karen Sullivan, The Inner Lives of Medieval Inquisitors (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012), 296 pp. Violence, persecution, cruelty, torture . . . these seem to be the popular topics among medieval historians at the moment, and Karen Sullivan's book fits right in. In clear and effective prose, she studies seven individuals whom she denominates "inquisitors." Her approach is to organize her very detailed analysis of these men, both as described by their contemporaries and as seen in their own writings, Common Knowledge 19:1 © 2013 by Duke University Press under a set of binary oppositions such as judicial (a legal approach that allows accusation and defense) versus penitential (a framework in which the individual is always guilty of sin), or zeal (determination to save the community from threat) versus charity (concern for the soul of the heretic). In an interesting and original interpretation, she associates the zeal of figures such as Conrad of Marburg or Thomas Aquinas with a view of heretics as having a fixed identity, whereas more charitable spiritual leaders such as Wazo of Liège or Peter Martyr understand the misguided self as unstable and therefore educable, even convertible and redeemable. The inclusion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Evening's Empire: A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe

Common Knowledge , Volume 19 (1) – Dec 21, 2013

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-1815818
Publisher site
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Abstract

doi 10.1215/0961754X-1815800 Karen Sullivan, The Inner Lives of Medieval Inquisitors (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012), 296 pp. Violence, persecution, cruelty, torture . . . these seem to be the popular topics among medieval historians at the moment, and Karen Sullivan's book fits right in. In clear and effective prose, she studies seven individuals whom she denominates "inquisitors." Her approach is to organize her very detailed analysis of these men, both as described by their contemporaries and as seen in their own writings, Common Knowledge 19:1 © 2013 by Duke University Press under a set of binary oppositions such as judicial (a legal approach that allows accusation and defense) versus penitential (a framework in which the individual is always guilty of sin), or zeal (determination to save the community from threat) versus charity (concern for the soul of the heretic). In an interesting and original interpretation, she associates the zeal of figures such as Conrad of Marburg or Thomas Aquinas with a view of heretics as having a fixed identity, whereas more charitable spiritual leaders such as Wazo of Liège or Peter Martyr understand the misguided self as unstable and therefore educable, even convertible and redeemable. The inclusion

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Dec 21, 2013

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