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ENLIGHTENMENT ASPIRATIONS OF PROGRESS IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY GERMAN THEORY

ENLIGHTENMENT ASPIRATIONS OF PROGRESS IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY GERMAN THEORY melody.2 But precisely because we no longer share the same historical horizon as these earlier writers, we ought to consider how the continued use of such categories in music analysis inadvertently imports deeper aesthetic and cultural beliefs into interpretations of musical structure. Most importantly, we should recognize the extent to which the eighteenth-century Satzlehre represents cultural ideals while also explaining musical practice. This study demonstrates how a consistent set of abstract categories was used in German treatises to define and explain a diverse collection of theoretical topics: diminution, dissonance treatment, harmony (chord types, harmonization, mode/key), and periodicity. In addition to Kirnberger, examples from the writings of Christoph Bernhard, Friedrich Erhard Niedt, Johann Gottfried Walther, Johann David Heinichen, Johann Mattheson, Joseph Riepel, C. P. E. Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg, and Heinrich Christoph Koch reveal a conceptual network governed by several binary oppositions: essential/nonessential, norm/derivation, and necessity/freedom. Although not always appearing together, each of these three conceptual oppositions maps onto a deeper one between Nature and artifice, and projects aspirations of aesthetic and cultural progress towards the latter, derivative terms. Far from being coincidental, this common network of abstract categories appears to represent a much deeper level of eighteenth-century musical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

ENLIGHTENMENT ASPIRATIONS OF PROGRESS IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY GERMAN THEORY

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-47-2-273
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

melody.2 But precisely because we no longer share the same historical horizon as these earlier writers, we ought to consider how the continued use of such categories in music analysis inadvertently imports deeper aesthetic and cultural beliefs into interpretations of musical structure. Most importantly, we should recognize the extent to which the eighteenth-century Satzlehre represents cultural ideals while also explaining musical practice. This study demonstrates how a consistent set of abstract categories was used in German treatises to define and explain a diverse collection of theoretical topics: diminution, dissonance treatment, harmony (chord types, harmonization, mode/key), and periodicity. In addition to Kirnberger, examples from the writings of Christoph Bernhard, Friedrich Erhard Niedt, Johann Gottfried Walther, Johann David Heinichen, Johann Mattheson, Joseph Riepel, C. P. E. Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg, and Heinrich Christoph Koch reveal a conceptual network governed by several binary oppositions: essential/nonessential, norm/derivation, and necessity/freedom. Although not always appearing together, each of these three conceptual oppositions maps onto a deeper one between Nature and artifice, and projects aspirations of aesthetic and cultural progress towards the latter, derivative terms. Far from being coincidental, this common network of abstract categories appears to represent a much deeper level of eighteenth-century musical

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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