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Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature

Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature 154 The Jo urnal of Korean Studies the gendering of settler colonialism. To be sure, Uchida mentions female actors in the final two chapters of the book, showing how they increasingly assumed delegated fu nctions of the state, espe cially as "wise mothers and good wives." However, what about their activities during the earlier periods of 1876-191 0 and 1910-31? How did a male-dominated club of brokers assign gendered positions to women (and to other marginalized groups) and to what degree did the sub­ ordinated acquiesce? Answering these questions will likely shed an even more critical light on the operation of settler colonialism in all of its intersectional complexity. That one can even pose such questions is the sign of a truly insight­ ful piece of scholarship, one that students of colonialism in East Asia and beyond will no doubt enjoy for years to come. To oo A. HENRY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-SAN DI EGO * * * Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature by Karen Laura Thom­ ber. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2009. 559 pp. I halftone. $5 9 .95 (cloth) There are sometimes scholarly books that, regardless of their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 13, 2013

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Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2013.0001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

154 The Jo urnal of Korean Studies the gendering of settler colonialism. To be sure, Uchida mentions female actors in the final two chapters of the book, showing how they increasingly assumed delegated fu nctions of the state, espe cially as "wise mothers and good wives." However, what about their activities during the earlier periods of 1876-191 0 and 1910-31? How did a male-dominated club of brokers assign gendered positions to women (and to other marginalized groups) and to what degree did the sub­ ordinated acquiesce? Answering these questions will likely shed an even more critical light on the operation of settler colonialism in all of its intersectional complexity. That one can even pose such questions is the sign of a truly insight­ ful piece of scholarship, one that students of colonialism in East Asia and beyond will no doubt enjoy for years to come. To oo A. HENRY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-SAN DI EGO * * * Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature by Karen Laura Thom­ ber. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2009. 559 pp. I halftone. $5 9 .95 (cloth) There are sometimes scholarly books that, regardless of their

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 13, 2013

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