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Editors' Introduction: Teaching in a Time of War

Editors' Introduction: Teaching in a Time of War Editors’ Introduction: Teaching in a Time of War Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor There are certain historical moments when learning is more compressed and intense than [at] others. . . . After September 11, this is one of those moments. — Howard Zinn (2001) When Jennifer met her senior capstone class on the morning of 11 September, the assigned topic for the day had been “why we do the work we do”: the class was to have discussed how we in the discipline of English can justify our disciplinary work when such need exists in the world. While this question, framed as it was by urgent current events, became the question of the semes- ter, on that morning the class had little to say except in the prayers they offered together. When Marcy met her class of preservice teachers on 12 September, she started the class period by asking: “Imagine that you are teaching and something like this happens. What will you say to your students?” She started this way not only to get them to reflect on their own practice but, frankly, because she did not know how else to begin. She hoped that they would let http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Editors' Introduction: Teaching in a Time of War

Pedagogy , Volume 2 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Copyright
© 2002 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2-2-159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editors’ Introduction: Teaching in a Time of War Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor There are certain historical moments when learning is more compressed and intense than [at] others. . . . After September 11, this is one of those moments. — Howard Zinn (2001) When Jennifer met her senior capstone class on the morning of 11 September, the assigned topic for the day had been “why we do the work we do”: the class was to have discussed how we in the discipline of English can justify our disciplinary work when such need exists in the world. While this question, framed as it was by urgent current events, became the question of the semes- ter, on that morning the class had little to say except in the prayers they offered together. When Marcy met her class of preservice teachers on 12 September, she started the class period by asking: “Imagine that you are teaching and something like this happens. What will you say to your students?” She started this way not only to get them to reflect on their own practice but, frankly, because she did not know how else to begin. She hoped that they would let

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

References