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Editors' Introduction: Ethics, Celebrity, and the Representation of Teaching in the Profession

Editors' Introduction: Ethics, Celebrity, and the Representation of Teaching in the Profession Editors’ Introduction: Ethics, Celebrity, and the Representation of Teaching in the Profession Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor This issue of Pedagogy opens with Gail Stygall’s examination of a specific instance — the struggle over the unionization of teaching assistants at the Uni- versity of Washington — that crystallizes the ongoing question of the journal itself: What is the relationship between praxis and theory? That is (to para- phrase Marianne Moore on poetry), how do the “real toads” of our everyday professional lives thrive in the “imaginary gardens” that are our theories? As editors, we struggle with our own toads. In his series of columns as the new editor of PMLA, Carlos J. Alonso has identified many of them; in particular, we were struck by his discussion of the move in the profession away from refereed submissions and toward solicited ones. As Seth Lerer argues in his letter included in one column, “Now it is not acceptance but solicitation that marks achievement — you know you’ve made it when you’re asked for an article” (Alonso 2001: 10). Though Alonso points out some of the difficulties faced by PMLA that might account for the recent makeup of its issues, we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Editors' Introduction: Ethics, Celebrity, and the Representation of Teaching in the Profession

Pedagogy , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Copyright
© 2003 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-3-1-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editors’ Introduction: Ethics, Celebrity, and the Representation of Teaching in the Profession Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor This issue of Pedagogy opens with Gail Stygall’s examination of a specific instance — the struggle over the unionization of teaching assistants at the Uni- versity of Washington — that crystallizes the ongoing question of the journal itself: What is the relationship between praxis and theory? That is (to para- phrase Marianne Moore on poetry), how do the “real toads” of our everyday professional lives thrive in the “imaginary gardens” that are our theories? As editors, we struggle with our own toads. In his series of columns as the new editor of PMLA, Carlos J. Alonso has identified many of them; in particular, we were struck by his discussion of the move in the profession away from refereed submissions and toward solicited ones. As Seth Lerer argues in his letter included in one column, “Now it is not acceptance but solicitation that marks achievement — you know you’ve made it when you’re asked for an article” (Alonso 2001: 10). Though Alonso points out some of the difficulties faced by PMLA that might account for the recent makeup of its issues, we

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

References