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Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's “New Environment”

Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's “New Environment” Editors’ Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education’s “New Environment” Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor com∙mit (k -mit'), v.t., -mit∙ted, -mit∙ting . 1. to perform or perpetrate, as a crime. 2. to pledge (oneself ), as to a position on an issue. 3. to give in trust or charge. 4. to place in confinement or custody. — com∙mit'ment, n. — com∙mit'ta∙ble , adj. — com∙mit'tal, n. —The Random House Dictionary, 1978 What does it mean to be a committed professional in the complex world of higher education? We have written before on the relatively recent shift to a culture of “accountability” in the new University of Excellence (see Holberg and Taylor 2005), where, as James F. Slevin (2002: 65 – 66) put it, a discourse of accountability permeates all we do: “We are all familiar with the pervasive - ness within the university nowadays of a discourse, derived from finance and accounting, of objectives, accountability, assessment, resources, selling (of credits to customers), and delivery (of instruction to the purchasers of cred - its and ultimately of the instructed to appropriate work positions).” Within such a discourse, it is not hard, especially for those of us in the humanities, to imagine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's “New Environment”

Pedagogy , Volume 7 (2) – Apr 1, 2007

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Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2006-026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editors’ Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education’s “New Environment” Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor com∙mit (k -mit'), v.t., -mit∙ted, -mit∙ting . 1. to perform or perpetrate, as a crime. 2. to pledge (oneself ), as to a position on an issue. 3. to give in trust or charge. 4. to place in confinement or custody. — com∙mit'ment, n. — com∙mit'ta∙ble , adj. — com∙mit'tal, n. —The Random House Dictionary, 1978 What does it mean to be a committed professional in the complex world of higher education? We have written before on the relatively recent shift to a culture of “accountability” in the new University of Excellence (see Holberg and Taylor 2005), where, as James F. Slevin (2002: 65 – 66) put it, a discourse of accountability permeates all we do: “We are all familiar with the pervasive - ness within the university nowadays of a discourse, derived from finance and accounting, of objectives, accountability, assessment, resources, selling (of credits to customers), and delivery (of instruction to the purchasers of cred - its and ultimately of the instructed to appropriate work positions).” Within such a discourse, it is not hard, especially for those of us in the humanities, to imagine

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2007

References