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Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's "New Environment"

Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's "New Environment" Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Volume 7, Number 2 doi 10.1215/15314200-2006-026 © 2007 by Duke University Press 151 Speaking of insanity, let’s turn to the latest example. In fall 2006, the discourse on accountability was invigorated by the U.S. Department of Education report titled “A Test of Leadership: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education,” commonly known as the Spellings Report after Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, who commissioned the panel that studied the issue. In the preamble to the report, the authors call on U.S. higher education institutions to “recommit themselves to their core public purposes” (ix), including promoting social mobility, inventiveness, and a “commitment to the kind of democracy that only an educated and informed citizenry makes possible” (ix). All well and good. However, the tone shifts sharply throughout the rest of the preface, as the goal of preparing students for advanced citizenship gives way to the goal of creating efficient workers. Note how the purposes of higher education are described in the following passage: But today that world is becoming tougher, more competitive, less forgiving of wasted resources and squandered opportunities. In tomorrow’s world a nation’s wealth will derive from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

Editors' Introduction: Commitment in Higher Education's "New Environment"

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2006-026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Volume 7, Number 2 doi 10.1215/15314200-2006-026 © 2007 by Duke University Press 151 Speaking of insanity, let’s turn to the latest example. In fall 2006, the discourse on accountability was invigorated by the U.S. Department of Education report titled “A Test of Leadership: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education,” commonly known as the Spellings Report after Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, who commissioned the panel that studied the issue. In the preamble to the report, the authors call on U.S. higher education institutions to “recommit themselves to their core public purposes” (ix), including promoting social mobility, inventiveness, and a “commitment to the kind of democracy that only an educated and informed citizenry makes possible” (ix). All well and good. However, the tone shifts sharply throughout the rest of the preface, as the goal of preparing students for advanced citizenship gives way to the goal of creating efficient workers. Note how the purposes of higher education are described in the following passage: But today that world is becoming tougher, more competitive, less forgiving of wasted resources and squandered opportunities. In tomorrow’s world a nation’s wealth will derive from

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2007

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