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Editorial Note

Editorial Note Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/article-pdf/26/1/1/904119/1editorial.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 The March 2021 issue was prepared as the Journal of Korean Studies found its new home at the Institute for Korean Studies, George Washington University. I worked on this issue with two other team members who joined JKS in the spring of 2020, Sunyoung Park (University of Southern California) as book review editor and Jack Davey (George Washington University) as managing editor. I am so fortunate to have them join the team and look forward to working with them in the coming years. This issue contains six articles that explore a broad range of themes such as environmental history, subjectivity, collaboration, humanitarianism, and citizen- ship. One article examines climate crises in the early Koryŏ period and demon- strates how it reinforced state power and ritual practices. Four articles explore marginalized subjects from the colonial to the postcolonial period such as or- phans, women, victims of the Korean War, and North Korean migrants. By ana- lyzing autobiographical writings of Korean writers in post-1945, one article sheds new light on the issue of pro-Japanese collaboration by delving into the narrative that produced a “shameful” colonial past. We greatly anticipate publishing our October 2021 thematic issue, guest edited by Gregg Brazinsky, to be titled “Reconsidering North Korea: Methods, Frame- works, and Sources.” This thematic issue will draw upon multiple disciplinary fields, including history, literature, anthropology, and political science, to discuss sources, methodologies, and some distinctive research challenges scholars face in their respective fields. The editorial office of the Journal of Korean Studies is housed at the Institute for Korean Studies, George Washington University. JKS is published by Duke Univer- sity Press. Publication of the Journal of Korean Studies is made possible by a gen- erous grant from the Academy of Korean Studies. For more information on JKS, please visit the following website: dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/. Journal of Korean Studies 26, no. 1 (March 2021) DOI 10.1215/07311613-8843717 © 2021 Journal of Korean Studies Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Editorial Note

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Mar 1, 2021

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Copyright
Copyright © 2021 Journal of Korean Studies Inc.
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/07311613-8843717
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/article-pdf/26/1/1/904119/1editorial.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 The March 2021 issue was prepared as the Journal of Korean Studies found its new home at the Institute for Korean Studies, George Washington University. I worked on this issue with two other team members who joined JKS in the spring of 2020, Sunyoung Park (University of Southern California) as book review editor and Jack Davey (George Washington University) as managing editor. I am so fortunate to have them join the team and look forward to working with them in the coming years. This issue contains six articles that explore a broad range of themes such as environmental history, subjectivity, collaboration, humanitarianism, and citizen- ship. One article examines climate crises in the early Koryŏ period and demon- strates how it reinforced state power and ritual practices. Four articles explore marginalized subjects from the colonial to the postcolonial period such as or- phans, women, victims of the Korean War, and North Korean migrants. By ana- lyzing autobiographical writings of Korean writers in post-1945, one article sheds new light on the issue of pro-Japanese collaboration by delving into the narrative that produced a “shameful” colonial past. We greatly anticipate publishing our October 2021 thematic issue, guest edited by Gregg Brazinsky, to be titled “Reconsidering North Korea: Methods, Frame- works, and Sources.” This thematic issue will draw upon multiple disciplinary fields, including history, literature, anthropology, and political science, to discuss sources, methodologies, and some distinctive research challenges scholars face in their respective fields. The editorial office of the Journal of Korean Studies is housed at the Institute for Korean Studies, George Washington University. JKS is published by Duke Univer- sity Press. Publication of the Journal of Korean Studies is made possible by a gen- erous grant from the Academy of Korean Studies. For more information on JKS, please visit the following website: dukeupress.edu/journal-of-korean-studies/. Journal of Korean Studies 26, no. 1 (March 2021) DOI 10.1215/07311613-8843717 © 2021 Journal of Korean Studies Inc.

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2021

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