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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction Winter 2007 palpable reminder of vulnerability and victimization, the Vietnam photos obliterated empathy. Kaik believed that extreme modes of spectatorship breeds voyeuristic looking. Readers seeing photographs of Japan’s aggression in Asia, as if for the first time, saw them without empathy, without identification, in the mode of consumption. No doubt Kaik should trouble us, too. Our gaze is presently fixed on Abu Ghraib, while evidence of killings in Vietnam, Chile, Indonesia, and Palestine are reduced to nothing. The epistemic privilege of the spectator, Suttmeier reminds us, obliterates the past, naturalizing it and political responsibilities. This theme of how we are made carries over into Shu Kuge’s scrutiny of the bereft category “woman writers” in Tamura Toshiko’s stories. In his “Politics of Doodling: Tamura Toshiko’s ‘A Woman Writer,’ ” Kuge’s premise is that writing never represents a self but rather either engages selves already ideologically predicated or crafts partial, abject ones. Because Tamura’s short stories, and particularly her “A Woman Writer,” focus on the refusal of writers to stay within the lines, to produce on a regular schedule to assume the burden of secondariness and substitute doodling for work, Kuge asserts that Tamura is primarily a political writer. Tamura http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 15 (3) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2007-001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Winter 2007 palpable reminder of vulnerability and victimization, the Vietnam photos obliterated empathy. Kaik believed that extreme modes of spectatorship breeds voyeuristic looking. Readers seeing photographs of Japan’s aggression in Asia, as if for the first time, saw them without empathy, without identification, in the mode of consumption. No doubt Kaik should trouble us, too. Our gaze is presently fixed on Abu Ghraib, while evidence of killings in Vietnam, Chile, Indonesia, and Palestine are reduced to nothing. The epistemic privilege of the spectator, Suttmeier reminds us, obliterates the past, naturalizing it and political responsibilities. This theme of how we are made carries over into Shu Kuge’s scrutiny of the bereft category “woman writers” in Tamura Toshiko’s stories. In his “Politics of Doodling: Tamura Toshiko’s ‘A Woman Writer,’ ” Kuge’s premise is that writing never represents a self but rather either engages selves already ideologically predicated or crafts partial, abject ones. Because Tamura’s short stories, and particularly her “A Woman Writer,” focus on the refusal of writers to stay within the lines, to produce on a regular schedule to assume the burden of secondariness and substitute doodling for work, Kuge asserts that Tamura is primarily a political writer. Tamura

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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