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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction vi places outside the East Asia circuit to write across regions as a means of expanding a common language of progressive scholarship. In editing this volume, I sought to reinforce the complex connections that in my view already exist and that could, Derrida’s recent polemic on Marx notwithstanding, cautiously be called a New Internationalism. At the very least, commonalities are binding scholars in unforeseen ways, such as the preoccupation with the extremes of alimentation-glut and starvation-expressed in the otherwise dissimilar work of Gang Yue and William Pietz. T h e two are momentarily connected, and linked by proximity to the absent body of Howland’s “Chinaman,” the murderous body of Park’s female worker, and the bodily semiotics of Seth’s Naxalite terrorists. By situating these essays together, I a m suggesting that they may each possess things of value to others (theoretical resources, critical strategies, unresolved problems, meaningful errors, spectacularly useful juxtapositions, research strategies) that remain to be negotiated. Several unanticipated connections appear here as well. First, many of the papers indicate a move to incorporate the exuberant pessimism of the Frankfurt School’s cultural Marxism. Second, the papers as a body showwith one exception-a striking disregard for questions that have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-2-v
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

vi places outside the East Asia circuit to write across regions as a means of expanding a common language of progressive scholarship. In editing this volume, I sought to reinforce the complex connections that in my view already exist and that could, Derrida’s recent polemic on Marx notwithstanding, cautiously be called a New Internationalism. At the very least, commonalities are binding scholars in unforeseen ways, such as the preoccupation with the extremes of alimentation-glut and starvation-expressed in the otherwise dissimilar work of Gang Yue and William Pietz. T h e two are momentarily connected, and linked by proximity to the absent body of Howland’s “Chinaman,” the murderous body of Park’s female worker, and the bodily semiotics of Seth’s Naxalite terrorists. By situating these essays together, I a m suggesting that they may each possess things of value to others (theoretical resources, critical strategies, unresolved problems, meaningful errors, spectacularly useful juxtapositions, research strategies) that remain to be negotiated. Several unanticipated connections appear here as well. First, many of the papers indicate a move to incorporate the exuberant pessimism of the Frankfurt School’s cultural Marxism. Second, the papers as a body showwith one exception-a striking disregard for questions that have

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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