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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction positions 21:3 Summer 2013 practitioners, and witnesses. Healing emerges when the gaps that comfort women characteristically leave between words and signifieds are recognized to be political. The shamanic performance, Kim determines, compensates for justice denied; the performance is "a mouthpiece for the articulation of politics and the everyday," yet at the same time it allows "spectral matters from the crevices of history" to collapse and reemerge as "now -- a field of poiesis and mimetic encounter." In Ben Tran's "I Speak in the Third Person: Women and Language in Colonial Vietnam," a less traumatic yet, analytically speaking, equally familiar problem with the subject arises. Working with Khai Hng's 1934 novel N ch ng xuân (In the Midst of Spring), Tran focuses on Dng Thi a ` Mai, the novel's protagonist. Tran explains that modernist Vietnamese poetic language had invented a new pronoun, tôi, meaning "the articulation of an individual's autonomy, interior depth, psyche, and self-consciousness." Tôi played a central role in the struggle over social subjectivity and, as in other language communities at this time, in the struggle of female individuals to lay claim to tôi and the individualized experiences alleged to be attendant on it. Tran ends http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 21 (3) – Jul 1, 2013

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2144932
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 21:3 Summer 2013 practitioners, and witnesses. Healing emerges when the gaps that comfort women characteristically leave between words and signifieds are recognized to be political. The shamanic performance, Kim determines, compensates for justice denied; the performance is "a mouthpiece for the articulation of politics and the everyday," yet at the same time it allows "spectral matters from the crevices of history" to collapse and reemerge as "now -- a field of poiesis and mimetic encounter." In Ben Tran's "I Speak in the Third Person: Women and Language in Colonial Vietnam," a less traumatic yet, analytically speaking, equally familiar problem with the subject arises. Working with Khai Hng's 1934 novel N ch ng xuân (In the Midst of Spring), Tran focuses on Dng Thi a ` Mai, the novel's protagonist. Tran explains that modernist Vietnamese poetic language had invented a new pronoun, tôi, meaning "the articulation of an individual's autonomy, interior depth, psyche, and self-consciousness." Tôi played a central role in the struggle over social subjectivity and, as in other language communities at this time, in the struggle of female individuals to lay claim to tôi and the individualized experiences alleged to be attendant on it. Tran ends

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2013

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