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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction 1999 by Duke University Press. positions 7:2 Fall 1999 Tim Oakes’s view on the processes of transnationalizing capital places gender difference differently in economic globalization. Oakes looks at gendered labor, particularly feminized labor, through what he calls a local lens, because for him the local is a place where agents of national-development policies and agents of displaced late capital set u p shop together. In “Bathing in the Far Village: Globalization, Transnational Capital, and the Cultural Politics of Modernity in China,” Oakes examines a scheme set u p in the villages of a Chinese ethnic minority, the Mia0 people, to market “authentic” batik to altruistic consumers in elite markets on the West Coast of North America. His point is not only that consumption schemes based on benevolent hallucinations about sustainable development, cultural survival, and gender empowerment will backfire but that an analytic focus on them erases the activities of the Chinese state. Decentralized Chinese state policy favors the economics of tourism and thus rests its modernization schemes on making sure it retains the key attraction, which is to say, ethnic primitives and their authentic batik work. Gender intersects with ethnicization and state capitalism. Mary Ann O’Donnell’s “Path Breaking: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-2-271
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1999 by Duke University Press. positions 7:2 Fall 1999 Tim Oakes’s view on the processes of transnationalizing capital places gender difference differently in economic globalization. Oakes looks at gendered labor, particularly feminized labor, through what he calls a local lens, because for him the local is a place where agents of national-development policies and agents of displaced late capital set u p shop together. In “Bathing in the Far Village: Globalization, Transnational Capital, and the Cultural Politics of Modernity in China,” Oakes examines a scheme set u p in the villages of a Chinese ethnic minority, the Mia0 people, to market “authentic” batik to altruistic consumers in elite markets on the West Coast of North America. His point is not only that consumption schemes based on benevolent hallucinations about sustainable development, cultural survival, and gender empowerment will backfire but that an analytic focus on them erases the activities of the Chinese state. Decentralized Chinese state policy favors the economics of tourism and thus rests its modernization schemes on making sure it retains the key attraction, which is to say, ethnic primitives and their authentic batik work. Gender intersects with ethnicization and state capitalism. Mary Ann O’Donnell’s “Path Breaking:

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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