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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction vi tently exceeding older domains, reshaping older conventions, recycling older techniques. Naifei Ding’s extraordinary “Tears of Ressentiment; or, Zhang Zhupo’s /in Ping Mei” is acutely critical and suffused with feminist laughter, and it exemplifies movement also present to some degree in the other essays. “Tears” evades what Gayatri Spivak calls “information retrieval” (the native or area scholar offers u p unmediated knowledge to the uninitiated) by fully disclosing the ways knowledge is always mediate. Her political valence confirmed, Ding concentrates on a dynamic that she finds distilled in popular texts and commentaries on vernacular fiction written by redundant, bitter men in the late Ming-early Qing. Their writing/reading, Ding shows, recoded a perversely misogynistic literary ideal. Their ideal reader ensured his own potency by a parallactic model of reading in which a misogynistic ethical imaginary, saturated with ressentiment, fortified itself by affixing ethical righteousness to literary poetics to sexual pleasure. This triangulated circuit of desire coursed through vernacular publication projects in which an ideal reader (gendered male) valiantly shielded an allegedly inept, feminized, mass readership against dangerously “incorrect” readings by annotating contaminating texts. This misogynistic discourse juxtaposes lust and filiality and constantly reestablishes by default the centered, proper reading http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (3) – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-3-v
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

vi tently exceeding older domains, reshaping older conventions, recycling older techniques. Naifei Ding’s extraordinary “Tears of Ressentiment; or, Zhang Zhupo’s /in Ping Mei” is acutely critical and suffused with feminist laughter, and it exemplifies movement also present to some degree in the other essays. “Tears” evades what Gayatri Spivak calls “information retrieval” (the native or area scholar offers u p unmediated knowledge to the uninitiated) by fully disclosing the ways knowledge is always mediate. Her political valence confirmed, Ding concentrates on a dynamic that she finds distilled in popular texts and commentaries on vernacular fiction written by redundant, bitter men in the late Ming-early Qing. Their writing/reading, Ding shows, recoded a perversely misogynistic literary ideal. Their ideal reader ensured his own potency by a parallactic model of reading in which a misogynistic ethical imaginary, saturated with ressentiment, fortified itself by affixing ethical righteousness to literary poetics to sexual pleasure. This triangulated circuit of desire coursed through vernacular publication projects in which an ideal reader (gendered male) valiantly shielded an allegedly inept, feminized, mass readership against dangerously “incorrect” readings by annotating contaminating texts. This misogynistic discourse juxtaposes lust and filiality and constantly reestablishes by default the centered, proper reading

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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