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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/positions/article-pdf/30/1/1/1469002/1lanza.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 02 April 2022 Fabio Lanza During the long months of the pandemic, for many of us, the very under- standable and very human desire to “return to normal” has been tempered by the political awareness that such a return was not only impossible but also undesirable, that normality itself, as protesters in Chile loudly proclaimed, is indeed the problem. The common theme of the protests that shook the pan- demic lockdowns of 2020, from Santiago to Minneapolis, was precisely that it was the very assumptions informing contemporary social relationships that had to be completely rethought and replaced. That it could not be any more a question of reforming specic p fi ractices and rules — be they those of the neoliberal economy or of the police state— or of providing some extra welfare benet fi s in times of crisis; it was the way we think about our world, the forms of its politics, and the discourse legitimizing them that needed to be challenged. Radical epistemic change was (and is) necessary. It is there- positions 30:1 doi 10.1215/10679847-9417916 Copyright 2022 by Duke University Press Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/positions/article-pdf/30/1/1/1469002/1lanza.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions , Volume 30 (1) – Feb 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright 2022 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-9417916
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/positions/article-pdf/30/1/1/1469002/1lanza.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 02 April 2022 Fabio Lanza During the long months of the pandemic, for many of us, the very under- standable and very human desire to “return to normal” has been tempered by the political awareness that such a return was not only impossible but also undesirable, that normality itself, as protesters in Chile loudly proclaimed, is indeed the problem. The common theme of the protests that shook the pan- demic lockdowns of 2020, from Santiago to Minneapolis, was precisely that it was the very assumptions informing contemporary social relationships that had to be completely rethought and replaced. That it could not be any more a question of reforming specic p fi ractices and rules — be they those of the neoliberal economy or of the police state— or of providing some extra welfare benet fi s in times of crisis; it was the way we think about our world, the forms of its politics, and the discourse legitimizing them that needed to be challenged. Radical epistemic change was (and is) necessary. It is there- positions 30:1 doi 10.1215/10679847-9417916 Copyright 2022 by Duke University Press Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/positions/article-pdf/30/1/1/1469002/1lanza.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user

Journal

positionsDuke University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2022

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