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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction 23:2 May 2015 phantasmatic and physical, because the shared anxiety that is made visible in their descriptions of space is also contingent on their historic and material specificity." Thus the essay weaves together political protests and cerebral debates, the metabolism architectural movement and nation-directed capital investment, city planning and the ghosts of imperial Tokyo inherited in the desperate immediate post-Pacific War decade and the biomechanical dream of a city composed of an embryonic spine feathering out into a communications mecca, where "hauntological" presences, or what Adriasola calls a toponymical presence built on a haunted landscape of the returning. Tillack's "Concrete Abstractions: Gotô Meisei's Hapless Danchi Dwellers and Japan's Economic Miracle," focuses differently on a similarly miraculous period, the reconstruction of Tokyo and the violence of the production of abstract space. The obliteration of vernacular space in the horrific abstraction of value out of real-estate development following the mobilization of labor into Tokyo creates "productivism" (seisansei), the affect Tillak pursues in close analysis of Gotô Meisei's 1970 dystopic story "Who's There?" Tillak overwhelmingly marshals the practical, historical detail that went into the planning and construction of the grotesquely huge and brutal housing estates where Tokyoites lived as their labor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 23 (2) – May 1, 2015

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2860954
Publisher site
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Abstract

23:2 May 2015 phantasmatic and physical, because the shared anxiety that is made visible in their descriptions of space is also contingent on their historic and material specificity." Thus the essay weaves together political protests and cerebral debates, the metabolism architectural movement and nation-directed capital investment, city planning and the ghosts of imperial Tokyo inherited in the desperate immediate post-Pacific War decade and the biomechanical dream of a city composed of an embryonic spine feathering out into a communications mecca, where "hauntological" presences, or what Adriasola calls a toponymical presence built on a haunted landscape of the returning. Tillack's "Concrete Abstractions: Gotô Meisei's Hapless Danchi Dwellers and Japan's Economic Miracle," focuses differently on a similarly miraculous period, the reconstruction of Tokyo and the violence of the production of abstract space. The obliteration of vernacular space in the horrific abstraction of value out of real-estate development following the mobilization of labor into Tokyo creates "productivism" (seisansei), the affect Tillak pursues in close analysis of Gotô Meisei's 1970 dystopic story "Who's There?" Tillak overwhelmingly marshals the practical, historical detail that went into the planning and construction of the grotesquely huge and brutal housing estates where Tokyoites lived as their labor

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: May 1, 2015

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