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Edge

Edge Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/15/1/164/1805016/164vanni.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 03 April 2023 LIVI NG LEXI CON F OR THE E NV I R ONMENTA L HU MAN I T I ES ILARIA VANNI University of Technology Sydney, Australia ALEXANDRA CROSBY University of Technology Sydney, Australia xpressions such as “hard edge” or “on a knife-edge” link edges in the popular imagi- E nation to cognates like border, boundary, frontier,or limit. “Teetering on the edge” of climate change/extinction/famine could be a typical headline; it is also an inadequate way to explain the experience of disaster and catastrophe. As a concept, edge has mul- tiple intellectual genealogies, from ecology to business studies and cultural theory. In each field it has slightly different connotations, but it maintains a basic shared mean- ing: it signifies a transition zone between different systems. In this lexicon entry, we explore the edge as an intermingling of diverse elements. Attending to the rich possibil- ities resulting from such interactions is significant to interdisciplinary scholarship in the environmental humanities, and in this entry, we summarize edge as a traveling con- cept in ecology and cultural theory, providing examples to think about and work with edges. Thinking and Working with Edges http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Humanities Duke University Press

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Copyright
© 2023 Ilaria Vanni and Alexandra Crosby
ISSN
2201-1919
eISSN
2201-1919
DOI
10.1215/22011919-10216217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/15/1/164/1805016/164vanni.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 03 April 2023 LIVI NG LEXI CON F OR THE E NV I R ONMENTA L HU MAN I T I ES ILARIA VANNI University of Technology Sydney, Australia ALEXANDRA CROSBY University of Technology Sydney, Australia xpressions such as “hard edge” or “on a knife-edge” link edges in the popular imagi- E nation to cognates like border, boundary, frontier,or limit. “Teetering on the edge” of climate change/extinction/famine could be a typical headline; it is also an inadequate way to explain the experience of disaster and catastrophe. As a concept, edge has mul- tiple intellectual genealogies, from ecology to business studies and cultural theory. In each field it has slightly different connotations, but it maintains a basic shared mean- ing: it signifies a transition zone between different systems. In this lexicon entry, we explore the edge as an intermingling of diverse elements. Attending to the rich possibil- ities resulting from such interactions is significant to interdisciplinary scholarship in the environmental humanities, and in this entry, we summarize edge as a traveling con- cept in ecology and cultural theory, providing examples to think about and work with edges. Thinking and Working with Edges

Journal

Environmental HumanitiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2023

References