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Dynamism in African Christian Music: The Search for Identity and Self-Expression

Dynamism in African Christian Music: The Search for Identity and Self-Expression Dynamism in African Christian Music: The Search for Identity and Self-Expression f. Nathan Corbitt We are like a strange beast with three heads-one looks perpetually behind, one looks steadily under our feet, and the third is poised to the heavens, dreamily.-Taban Lo Liyong, Popular Culture of East Africa Late on a Friday afternoon local Christians begin to gather at Roka Baptist Church, located halfway between the Kenya coastal towns of Kilifi and Malindi. As the sun sets on the Indian Ocean, arriving par­ ticipants descend from local buses and matatus (Kenya's passenger and make their way down a palm-lined sandy path to a mud vehicles) and plaster church compound. A pastor from the Penteco·stal church of the urban city Mombasa, old women from deep in the hinterland of Ugiriamani, a Baptist deacon from Kanamai, a youth choir from Roka-they all begin to gather for a worship event called Kukesha, kukesha being the Swahili word used by the local Christians to mean "to stay the night in watchful praise, witness, and prayer." Each person brings to the Kukesha event his or her own personal experience in We and gives witness as a means of seeking healing and reconciliation. Throughout the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Dynamism in African Christian Music: The Search for Identity and Self-Expression

Black Sacred Music , Volume 8 (2) – Sep 1, 1994

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.2.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dynamism in African Christian Music: The Search for Identity and Self-Expression f. Nathan Corbitt We are like a strange beast with three heads-one looks perpetually behind, one looks steadily under our feet, and the third is poised to the heavens, dreamily.-Taban Lo Liyong, Popular Culture of East Africa Late on a Friday afternoon local Christians begin to gather at Roka Baptist Church, located halfway between the Kenya coastal towns of Kilifi and Malindi. As the sun sets on the Indian Ocean, arriving par­ ticipants descend from local buses and matatus (Kenya's passenger and make their way down a palm-lined sandy path to a mud vehicles) and plaster church compound. A pastor from the Penteco·stal church of the urban city Mombasa, old women from deep in the hinterland of Ugiriamani, a Baptist deacon from Kanamai, a youth choir from Roka-they all begin to gather for a worship event called Kukesha, kukesha being the Swahili word used by the local Christians to mean "to stay the night in watchful praise, witness, and prayer." Each person brings to the Kukesha event his or her own personal experience in We and gives witness as a means of seeking healing and reconciliation. Throughout the

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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