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Dreamtime and Tribal Ritual: Elements of a Critical Theory of Popular Music

Dreamtime and Tribal Ritual: Elements of a Critical Theory of Popular Music Dreamtime and Tribal Ritual: Elements of a Critical Theory of Popular Music Peter Bubmann In a 1992 lecture on the media and commercialism, the American theologian Harvey Cox almost wallowed in the terminology of cul­ tural criticism: "We are still a prey to a manipulative system. Although it does not use the undisguised techniques of totalitarian states, it is still stripping us of our freedom. One after the other, all aspects of life-politics and business, culture and theology, as well as our spirituality and sexuality-are occupied by the commercial values and beguiling images of the market." Following Guy Debord, he condemned the mass unconsciousness caused by the media and concluded: "Today's media and consumption society is the incarna­ tion of Mammon." In a letter to the editor that appeared in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung on February 27, 1992 on the other hand, the writer took issue with an article panning the television series Beverly Hills 90210: "I like watching the program in order to switch off and dream. Perhaps it would not do any harm if some peo­ ple forgot they are intellectuals at least once in a while." These two examples are the extremes between which the reflec­ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Dreamtime and Tribal Ritual: Elements of a Critical Theory of Popular Music

Black Sacred Music , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 1, 1994

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.1.92
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dreamtime and Tribal Ritual: Elements of a Critical Theory of Popular Music Peter Bubmann In a 1992 lecture on the media and commercialism, the American theologian Harvey Cox almost wallowed in the terminology of cul­ tural criticism: "We are still a prey to a manipulative system. Although it does not use the undisguised techniques of totalitarian states, it is still stripping us of our freedom. One after the other, all aspects of life-politics and business, culture and theology, as well as our spirituality and sexuality-are occupied by the commercial values and beguiling images of the market." Following Guy Debord, he condemned the mass unconsciousness caused by the media and concluded: "Today's media and consumption society is the incarna­ tion of Mammon." In a letter to the editor that appeared in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung on February 27, 1992 on the other hand, the writer took issue with an article panning the television series Beverly Hills 90210: "I like watching the program in order to switch off and dream. Perhaps it would not do any harm if some peo­ ple forgot they are intellectuals at least once in a while." These two examples are the extremes between which the reflec­

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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