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Dissonant Prolongations Again Nontonic Extensions in Nineteenth-Century Music

Dissonant Prolongations Again Nontonic Extensions in Nineteenth-Century Music Taking my own Schenker-derived view of dissonant prolongations as a point of departure, this article attempts to clarify this phenomenon by considering it in relation to tonal prolongation. This is accomplished in three ways: by reconsidering Schenker's mature attitude toward tonality and dissonance in more detail, with particular emphasis on his idea that dissonant prolongations are based on tonicizable but nontonic triads; by examining a number of extended, if partial, precedents for such prolongations in his final publication, Der freie Satz ; and by supporting the article's main claim, that three songs by Hugo Wolf ending on nontonic chords suggest that they contain Schenkerain prolongations, being at once dissonant and tonal. The article ends by considering three tonal works by Brahms, Debussy, and Schoenberg that, though tonal and not completely dissonant, contain extended dissonant prolongations. dissonant prolongation Schenker's view of dominant prolongation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Dissonant Prolongations Again Nontonic Extensions in Nineteenth-Century Music

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 60 (1) – Apr 1, 2016

Dissonant Prolongations Again Nontonic Extensions in Nineteenth-Century Music


Robert P. Morgan Abstract Taking my own Schenker-derived view of dissonant prolongations as a point of departure, this article attempts to clarify this phenomenon by considering it in relation to tonal prolongation. This is accomplished in three ways: by reconsidering Schenker's mature attitude toward tonality and dissonance in more detail, with particular emphasis on his idea that dissonant prolongations are based on tonicizable but nontonic triads; by examining a number of extended, if partial, precedents for such prolongations in his final publication, Der freie Satz; and by supporting the article's main claim, that three songs by Hugo Wolf ending on nontonic chords suggest that they contain Schenkerain prolongations, being at once dissonant and tonal. The article ends by considering three tonal works by Brahms, Debussy, and Schoenberg that, though tonal and not completely dissonant, contain extended dissonant prolongations. Keywords dissonant prolongation, Schenker's view of dominant prolongation some forty years ago this journal published my first scholarly article, "Dissonant Prolongations: Theoretical and Compositional Precedents" (Morgan 1976). It dealt with Schenkerian theory and, more specifically, with whether it should be broadened to include prolongations of nontonal harmonies, offering a positive response through six analyses. The first three addressed sections of Schubert's song "Die Stadt" (1828), Liszt's Faust Symphony (1855), and Wagner's Parsifal (1882), and the last three treated complete piano pieces: Liszt's "Die Trauer-Gondel I" (1882) and "Bagatelle ohne Tonart" (1885) and Scriabin's "Énigme," op. 52/1 (1907). All but one were written during the nineteenth century, and all six remained at least partly under the influence of common-practice conventions. Without exception, however, the six involved dissonant prolongations, either of an augmented...
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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-3448737
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Taking my own Schenker-derived view of dissonant prolongations as a point of departure, this article attempts to clarify this phenomenon by considering it in relation to tonal prolongation. This is accomplished in three ways: by reconsidering Schenker's mature attitude toward tonality and dissonance in more detail, with particular emphasis on his idea that dissonant prolongations are based on tonicizable but nontonic triads; by examining a number of extended, if partial, precedents for such prolongations in his final publication, Der freie Satz ; and by supporting the article's main claim, that three songs by Hugo Wolf ending on nontonic chords suggest that they contain Schenkerain prolongations, being at once dissonant and tonal. The article ends by considering three tonal works by Brahms, Debussy, and Schoenberg that, though tonal and not completely dissonant, contain extended dissonant prolongations. dissonant prolongation Schenker's view of dominant prolongation

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2016

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