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Discovery of Disputes: Collective Memories on Textbooks and Japanese–South Korean Relations

Discovery of Disputes: Collective Memories on Textbooks and Japanese–South Korean Relations Historical perceptions in Northeast Asian countries, especially South Korea and Japan, can be observed through analysis of school history textbooks and the disputes related to these publications. Looking at this issue through a long-term lens it becomes apparent that today’s perceptions are direct descendants of the perceptions that appeared during the 1980s. This article shows that it is impossible to explain the escalation of the disputes through solely viewing the changes in descriptions of history in Japanese textbooks, but that interaction between China, Japan, and South Korea has been involved. South Korean society overlooked the Japanese textbook issue before the 1982 dispute. Thus it seems that only when China and some members of the Japanese populace first questioned the history being written and published in Japan that South Korea began questioning the changes being made to Japanese textbooks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Discovery of Disputes: Collective Memories on Textbooks and Japanese–South Korean Relations

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 17 (1) – Mar 12, 2012

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Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2012.0013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Historical perceptions in Northeast Asian countries, especially South Korea and Japan, can be observed through analysis of school history textbooks and the disputes related to these publications. Looking at this issue through a long-term lens it becomes apparent that today’s perceptions are direct descendants of the perceptions that appeared during the 1980s. This article shows that it is impossible to explain the escalation of the disputes through solely viewing the changes in descriptions of history in Japanese textbooks, but that interaction between China, Japan, and South Korea has been involved. South Korean society overlooked the Japanese textbook issue before the 1982 dispute. Thus it seems that only when China and some members of the Japanese populace first questioned the history being written and published in Japan that South Korea began questioning the changes being made to Japanese textbooks.

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 12, 2012

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