Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Digging Up Milton by Jennifer Wallace

Digging Up Milton by Jennifer Wallace Herzen history is “a meandering, shapeless, and inconclusive process, constantly prone to aberrations and easily dee fl cted from its inchoate purposes.” Whether applied to the person or to the progression of world events, nothing could be more contingent than that. — Caryl Emerson doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254180 Jennifer Wallace, Digging Up Milton (Manchester, UK: Cillian, 2015), 210 pp. On Tuesday, August 3, 1790, nearly 116 years after the death of John Milton, the poet’s coffin was unearthed from beneath the paving stones in the nave of St. Giles Cripplegate Church. By Wednesday morning the lead coffin had been pried open and looted of hair, teeth, a leg bone, and a jawbone — not of a Samsonian ass but of a poet (our ancestors’ stomachs, apparently, were stronger than our own). Twice in his poetry, in “Lycidas” (57 – 63) and Paradise Lost ( 7 . 34 – 3 8 ), M il ton darkly identie fi s with Orpheus, though hoping to ward off the Orphic fate of being torn apart. In Paradise Lost, he writes presciently of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Digging Up Milton by Jennifer Wallace

Common Knowledge , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/digging-up-milton-by-jennifer-wallace-wAtou1qqY5
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-4254192
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Herzen history is “a meandering, shapeless, and inconclusive process, constantly prone to aberrations and easily dee fl cted from its inchoate purposes.” Whether applied to the person or to the progression of world events, nothing could be more contingent than that. — Caryl Emerson doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254180 Jennifer Wallace, Digging Up Milton (Manchester, UK: Cillian, 2015), 210 pp. On Tuesday, August 3, 1790, nearly 116 years after the death of John Milton, the poet’s coffin was unearthed from beneath the paving stones in the nave of St. Giles Cripplegate Church. By Wednesday morning the lead coffin had been pried open and looted of hair, teeth, a leg bone, and a jawbone — not of a Samsonian ass but of a poet (our ancestors’ stomachs, apparently, were stronger than our own). Twice in his poetry, in “Lycidas” (57 – 63) and Paradise Lost ( 7 . 34 – 3 8 ), M il ton darkly identie fi s with Orpheus, though hoping to ward off the Orphic fate of being torn apart. In Paradise Lost, he writes presciently of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamor

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.