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DEEP-LEVEL PORTRAYALS OF DIRECTED AND MISDIRECTED MOTIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LYRIC SONG

DEEP-LEVEL PORTRAYALS OF DIRECTED AND MISDIRECTED MOTIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LYRIC SONG The era around 1800 was one of great aesthetic change. Eighteenthcentury philosophers began to write that the function of art was not so much to prode a true-to-life depiction of nature as it existed, but to ge artists free rein to interpret the facts and rearrange them to express what lay within themselves, to the point where nineteenth-century idealists could argue that ideas were the sole content of perceed objects and therefore of art.2 M. H. Abrams’s book, The Mirror and the Lamp, takes its title from the sea change in the poet’s role from passe mimetic reflector of external reality to acte, radiant projector contributing to the objects as perceed, a transition conveniently marked by Wordsworth’s observation of 1800 that “poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” ([1800], 448). Northrop Frye, noted mostly for his study of the archetypes that bind varied literatures into a common practice, began his career by revealing that the long-observed iconoclastic “prate symbolism” of William Blake (1757–1827) was but one example of how “every poet has his own distincte structure of imagery,” a sionary imagination identified with that poet, yet possesses a large “number of similarities to the structures of other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

DEEP-LEVEL PORTRAYALS OF DIRECTED AND MISDIRECTED MOTIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LYRIC SONG

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 48 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-48-1-25
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The era around 1800 was one of great aesthetic change. Eighteenthcentury philosophers began to write that the function of art was not so much to prode a true-to-life depiction of nature as it existed, but to ge artists free rein to interpret the facts and rearrange them to express what lay within themselves, to the point where nineteenth-century idealists could argue that ideas were the sole content of perceed objects and therefore of art.2 M. H. Abrams’s book, The Mirror and the Lamp, takes its title from the sea change in the poet’s role from passe mimetic reflector of external reality to acte, radiant projector contributing to the objects as perceed, a transition conveniently marked by Wordsworth’s observation of 1800 that “poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” ([1800], 448). Northrop Frye, noted mostly for his study of the archetypes that bind varied literatures into a common practice, began his career by revealing that the long-observed iconoclastic “prate symbolism” of William Blake (1757–1827) was but one example of how “every poet has his own distincte structure of imagery,” a sionary imagination identified with that poet, yet possesses a large “number of similarities to the structures of other

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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